Charlie McGettigan calls for Ireland to boycott Eurovision in Israel

Eurovision winner Charlie McGettigan has called for Ireland to boycott next year's contest if it is to be held in Israel.

The Rock 'n' Roll Kids singer's remarks came a day after 60 Palestinians, including an eight-month-old baby, were killed by Israeli troops in Gaza.

Charlie McGettigan

"I think the people who organise the Eurovision should make a statement by not having the Eurovision in Jerusalem next year, that they should have it somewhere else," McGettigan told Joe Duffy on RTÉ Radio 1 yesterday.

I think they need to make a decision, but if they don’t, I think we need to make the decision not to go.

"It was dreadful yesterday [Monday] seeing Netanyahu and the Trumps celebrating while people are dead. It's frightening."

US President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka Trump and US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin attend the opening ceremony of the new US embassy in Jerusalem (Sebastian Scheiner/AP)

He said a boycott would have an impact.

"It's a chance for the whole of Europe who are involved in Eurovision to make a statement and sort of say, 'Look, we don't agree with this, to celebrate while other people are dying'."

"It was like Nero in Rome, he fiddled while Rome burned.

The Eurovision, first of all, should be encouraged to boycott it and have it in another country and if they don't, we shouldn't go.


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