US restaurant management platform to create 120 jobs in Dublin

US restaurant management platform to create 120 jobs in Dublin
Mary Buckley, Executive Director IDA Ireland with Robert McGarry, Vice President at Toast Inc. Photo: Colm Mahady / Fennells

US restaurant management platform Toast will create 120 jobs with the opening of a new office in Dublin.

The announcement marks the company's first international technology and product development centre outside of North America.

Launched in 2013, it currently employs 40 people across engineering, development and support roles.

The new office, based in Ballast House on Westmoreland Street, will have the capacity to accommodate 200 people.

Toast is seeking recruits in software engineering, data analytics, product design and software development for the new site.

The venture is supported by the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation through IDA Ireland.

Commenting on his visit Dublin for the official opening, Hugh Scandrett, Senior Vice President of Engineering said: “The response to placing our first international office in Dublin has been positive and we look forward to growing our presence here.

"I look forward to expanding our team with talented people and developing products that will be central to Toast’s growth in the coming years.

Dublin is a recognised technology hub in Europe which makes it the right location for our investment in this great new office.

Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys said: “I am delighted that Toast are substantially growing their presence here with 120 new roles being created at their new offices in Dublin.

"This expansion shows that we continue to have the right skills and talent available to enable exciting companies to grow and further embed their operations in Ireland. I wish them well for the future.”

Mary Buckley, Executive Director of IDA Ireland, commented: "IDA is delighted to support the growth plans for Toast in Dublin and welcomes the additional R&D investment for the technology ecosystem in Ireland. High growth international companies continue to be attracted to Ireland due to the ease of access to a talented workforce.”

More on this topic

New Marine Institute boss appointedNew Marine Institute boss appointed

Cavan to get 120 new jobsCavan to get 120 new jobs

EY to create 600 jobs at 10 offices in IrelandEY to create 600 jobs at 10 offices in Ireland

100 new jobs for Cork as building firm MMD Construction expand100 new jobs for Cork as building firm MMD Construction expand

More in this Section

Flat rate deductions are unfairly squashedFlat rate deductions are unfairly squashed

Chile protests continue after government backs down on fare hikeChile protests continue after government backs down on fare hike

Serious Fraud Office closes Libor rigging investigationSerious Fraud Office closes Libor rigging investigation

Johnson insists EU free trade agreement can be struck amid no-deal Brexit fearsJohnson insists EU free trade agreement can be struck amid no-deal Brexit fears


Lifestyle

'When a role became available in The River Lee following the refurbishment, I jumped at the chance!'You've Been Served: Sinead McDonald of The River Lee on life as a Brand Manager

It’s the personal stories from Bruce Springsteen that turn his new ‘Western Stars’ documentary into something special, the director tells Esther McCarthy.Bruce Springsteen's Western Stars documentary more than just a music film

Apart from the several variations in its spelling in Irish and English, Inishtubbrid, Co Clare is also recognised by three other names: Wall’s Island; O’Grady’s Island and Inishtubber which surely puts it up there as the island with most names — not counting say Inisvickillane, Co Kerry which has about 33 variations to that spelling.The Islands of Ireland: In search of tranquility

More and more communities and volunteers are taking on environmental tasks around the country. In Clonmel, Co Tipperary, for example, people have united to get rid of Himalayan balsam, an invasive plant, from the banks of the River Suir.‘Bashing’ invasive plants

More From The Irish Examiner