Rise in e-car power points

Rise in e-car power points

Germany has increased the number of public charging points for electric cars by a quarter in the past year, utility lobby BDEW said, although it said it was still not a profitable business.

Since the end of June 2017, 2,800 new public charging points have been added, bringing the total to 13,500, BDEW said.

Charging networks for battery-powered cars are expanding and carmakers are developing electric car models as part of a shift to low-carbon mobility.

BDEW said power companies were building and operating most of the charging facilities but the industry was being let down by carmakers, which were not yet offering enough electric car models at competitive prices for consumers.

“Over three-quarters of charging points are operated by electricity companies, although in view of the small number of e-cars, this is not profitable,” Stefan Kapferer, managing director of BDEW said.

“If electric mobility is to achieve a breakthrough in Germany in the next few years, then the car industry has to offer models to the market that can compete on price and performance with the combustion engine,” said Mr Kapferer.

Others offering chargers include car park operators, supermarkets, and hotels that subsidise charging facilities as add-on services that they hope will bring more revenue streams from cross-selling or pooling battery storage.

Germany had wanted 1m battery-powered cars by 2020 but currently has less than 100,000.

Take-up by customers of government funds aimed at promoting the technology has been hampered by the cost of the cars and limits on their driving ranges. This, in turn, delays the rollout of infrastructure to encourage usage, analysts say.

BDEW said the government should change residential property laws to enable more investment in private charging points because of 80% of future charging processes needed to take place at home rather than in public.

Car owners that do not want to charge at snail’s pace at home must now buy loading boxes, a cost of several thousand euros each, to speed charging beyond the level offered by a conventional domestic socket.

Home users also need permission from their local power provider to install the boxes, as too many cars loading simultaneously during peak evening hours would overload neighbourhood power networks.

-Reuters

More in this Section

Markets jump despite fresh US-China concernsMarkets jump despite fresh US-China concerns

Alexa privacy fears prompt action from EU data chiefAlexa privacy fears prompt action from EU data chief

Wicklow County Council puts brakes on Seán FitzPatrick's Greystones house-build planWicklow County Council puts brakes on Seán FitzPatrick's Greystones house-build plan

New York tech firm to open in LimerickNew York tech firm to open in Limerick


Lifestyle

Bryan Stevenson is the American civil rights lawyer who provided the inspiration for the newly-released film Just Mercy. Esther McCarthy spoke to him in IrelandReal-life lawyer Bryan Stevenson on inspiring Just Mercy

So I’ve booked my holidays. And before you ask, yes, I’m basing it around food and wine. I’ll report back in July, but I thought readers might be interested in my plan should you be thinking about a similar holiday.Wines to pick up on a trip to France

Esther N McCarthy is on a roll for the new year with sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes.Wish List: Sustainable solutions, cool citruses and vintage vibes

They have absolutely nothing really to do with Jerusalem or indeed with any type of artichoke, so what exactly are these curious little tubers?Currabinny Cooks: Exploring the versatility of Jerusalem artichokes

More From The Irish Examiner