No Irish city 'responded to climate change survey request'

No Irish city 'responded to climate change survey request'

An international organisation that measures efforts by cities worldwide to cut carbon emissions said that no Irish city has responded to its survey.

CDP earlier this week released rankings which showed that many cities around the world were doing more than their national governments to offset the influences of climate change.

Metropolitan authorities from London to Sydney and Boston were among a group of 15 setting out the most rigorous plans to achieve carbon or climate neutrality by 2050.

The moves are seen as evidence of ambition by local authorities to do their part in reining in global warming, almost two-thirds of global emissions come from cities.

However, CDP said that no Irish city responded to its requests. It approached Dublin, Belfast, Cork, Galway, Limerick, and Waterford.

“Unfortunately none of the Irish cities that we reached out to in 2018 responded to us,” a spokeswoman said.

“We would love to have have these Irish cities on board and telling us about their climate strategies and actions. Reporting is free of charge for cities,” she said.

CDP said that disclosures allows “cities to demonstrate commitment and action to citizens and track their progress towards a low-carbon, water-secure and deforestation-free world”.

“Reporting cities can track their progress against other cities in their region, country or globally and can learn from best practice — helping them in their transition to a low-carbon and water-secure and deforestation-free world.

"Cities can’t manage what they don’t measure and environmental reporting is the first step on the journey to climate leadership,” it said.

CDP said in contrast 50 Irish companies participated in its 2018 research.

Additional reporting Bloomberg

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