Former Déise star Charlie Ware dies

Another link with Waterford’s last All-Ireland winning senior hurling team of 1959 has been severed with the death of Charlie Ware, who gave a lifetime of service to the Erin’s Own club in the city.

He was a member of a well-known family which had its roots in Cork, his uncle Jim having the honour of captaining Waterford to their first All-Ireland title against Dublin in 1948 and his father — also Charlie — a member of the team which lost the 1938 final to the same opposition. ‘Young Charlie,’ as he was known, graduated to the Waterford squad in the late 50s and was right corner-forward on the team which defeated Cork by a goal in the 1959 final in Thurles. En route, they had swamped Tipperary in a memorable semi-final in the Cork Athletic Grounds, winning 9-3 to 3-4 having led 8-2 to 0-0 at half-time.

He filled the same position in the drawn All-Ireland final against Kilkenny, but lost his place for the replay. Several years later, he was part of the panel of players which celebrated victories in the Oireachtas final of 1962 and the National League in 1963.

Back then, rivalry between Erin’s Own and Mount Sion was razor sharp. In 1962, Erin’s Own denied them a 10th successive championship in a replay and it led to Charlie being nominated as Waterford captain.


More in this Section

Paul Kerrigan has seen best and worst of times

A fifth Munster crown in seven years for Crokes would be some achievement

The Kieran Shannon interview: Jason Sherlock on becoming the mentor he once needed

Brendan Rogers up for battle when chips are down


Breaking Stories

Michael Carrick treated for irregular heart rhythm

Cantona: I'd prefer to have Pep Guardiola as Manchester United manager

Lifestyle

Having fled the Nazis, Elizabeth Friedlander created her own typeface before moving to Kinsale

On the double: Jennifer Zamparelli and balancing a hectic life and baby number two

Trim back for the festivities with these Christmas fitness tips

The 40-year-old charity that ensures no-one dies alone and poor

More From The Irish Examiner