Books

Book reviews: All Over Ireland and Tales from the Emerald Isle and Other Green Shores

Billy O’Callaghan looks at two collections of short stories, one uneven and the other a series of enduring, almost timeless classics.

More

Book review: Dreamland: The True Story of America’s Opiate Addiction

Dreamland is the story of a town’s collapse in America’s mid west and its battle for recovery and redemption. Cormac O’Keeffe on the grip catastrophic drug addiction — legal and illegal — had on Portsmouth in Ohio.

More

Book review: The Festival of Insignificance

MILAN Kundera’s first novel in 14 years is a short, amusing, and thought-provoking meditation on the nature of insignificance. 

More

Book review: Poseidon’s Wake

THERE has always been a strain of science fiction concerned with exploring the human condition via journeys to faraway places. 

More

Book review: Our Souls At Night

KENT HARUF’S final novel, Our Souls at Night, completed before he died in November last year, is a beautifully poignant swansong for this much-loved American writer.

More

Book review: The Saffron Road: A Journey With Buddha’s Daughters

THIS is an expansive exploration of Buddhism and the plight of Buddhist nuns across the globe.

More

Book review: The Naked Surgeon: The Power And Peril Of Transparency In Medicine

SAMER NASHEF is fascinated by the power of numbers to foster transparency in medicine.

More

Book review: The House Of Hidden Mothers

ACTRESS and writer Meera Syal has set the literary bar high for herself. Her first novel Anita And Me is now a national curriculum set text, her second, Life Isn’t All Ha Ha Hee Hee, was made into a BBC drama.

More

Children’s books

Grandad’s Island by Benji Davies (Simon and Schuster €8.80)
Little Syd loves to visit his grandpa’s house at the end of the garden. 

More

Book review: Tender

Tender, a novel about being a gay man in unwelcoming 1970s Ireland, was published just after the marriage equality amendment was passed. That was purely coincidental, Belinda McKeon assures Caroline O’Doherty.

More

Book review: The Negotiator: A Memoir

George Mitchell’s life and career epitomise the American dream but it was his perception and patience that made it a great success, discovers Ryle T Dwyer.

More

Book review: The Life Of Saul Bellow: To Fame And Fortune, 1915-64

Leader’s account of the Nobel Prize-winning novelist weighs in at 812 pages, and this is only Part One, taking us up to the third of Bellow’s five marriages, writing of Humboldt’s Gift, and a secure position at the very summit of American letters.

More

Book review: Finders Keepers

With more than 50 novels under his belt, it’s admirable King still writes his own books, unlike some big authors whose names have been turned into brands.

More

Book review: The Framing of Harry Gleeson

THE hanging of an innocent man is of course the most cogent argument of all against the death penalty.

More

Book review: Mrs Engels

“NO-ONE understands men better than the women they don’t marry,” declares Lizzie Burns, the eponymous narrator of Gavin McCrea’s debut novel Mrs Engels.

More

Book review: The Turning Point

The Sunday Times bestselling author returns with a tale about finding love in unexpected circumstances.

More

Book review: Tiger Milk

TIGER Milk is made by mixing cheap Mariacron brandy and maracuja juice with milk from the school cafeteria in a wide-mouthed container of chocolate Müller milk. 

More

Children’s books

Murray The Horse by Gavin Puckett, illustrated by Frank Rodgers (Faber €7.55)
This handy little book of rhyme tells the story of a young horse called Murray, who dreams of becoming a world-renowned champion especially as his parents “won trophies and medals galore”. 

More

Kya deLongchamps reviews a new book on Wartski the jeweller

Wartski: The First 150 Years, really is something of a jewel. Author Geoffrey Munn is a familiar face on the BBC’s Antique Roadshow, where he tenderly unveils precious jewellery and object d’art brought to the wobbling tables every season.

More

Book review: My Life It’s A Long Story

Willie Nelson, at 82, has written an autobiography and Billy O’Callaghan finds it full of music, humour, thoughtfulness and insight culled from lessons learned the painful way — and surprisingly confessional.

More

Book review: The Glorious Heresies

Lisa McInerney has rattled the cage with her debut novel, The Glorious Heresies, an authentic portrayal of Cork City’s underclass, says Sue Leonard.

More

Book review: Cold Blood: Adventures with Reptiles and Amphibians

MEMOIRS by naturalists who became enthused by some aspect of wildlife when they were children and whose enthusiasm survives a lifetime are relatively common these days. 

More

Book review: The Residence: Inside The Private World Of The White House

BUTLERS, plumbers, doormen, florists, the executive pastry chef: these are just some of the hundreds of people that work at the White House for the President of the USA.

More

Book review: Your Father Sends His Love

THREE years ago Stuart Evers wrote his first collection of short tales, Ten Stories About Smoking.

More

Book review: Romancing Ireland

WHEN entertainer Richard Hayward died in a car accident, aged 72, it was front-page news in the Irish daily newspapers, not just in his hometown, Belfast. 

More

Book review: Data-ism: Inside The Big Data Revolution

IT is a long time since that old chestnut about computer geeks inheriting the earth began doing the rounds but, as this book points out, it’s maths nerds who are the real stars.

More

Book review: Disappeared

THE normal standards of right and wrong did not apply to his parishioners,” observes Fr Jack Fee early on in Anthony J Quinn’s Disappeared, “only what was necessary or unnecessary for survival.”

More

Children’s books

Bears Don’t Read
by Emma Chichester Clark
(Harper Collins €8.80 ) 

More

Book review: The Ballroom Cafe

High court reporter Ann O’Loughlin sees us at our most distressed moments and is particularly passionate about the plight of children put up for forced adoption, a thread in her first novel. She explains all to Sue Leonard.

More

Book review: Ardennes 1944: Hitler’s Last Gamble

Anthony Beevor has written another history of another decisive WWII battle — the last throw of the dice for the Nazis, the Battle of the Bulge. Richard Fitzpatrick enjoyed it.

More

Book review: The Followers

If you’re looking for a summer read with brains, this is the perfect book.

More

Book review: The Girl Missing From the Window

AT FIRST glance, Paul O’Reilly’s debut collection of short stories seems issue-driven. 

More

Book review: Death Wears A Beauty Mask & Other Stories

THE facts speak for themselves, and they are very, very impressive: Over 50 novels published, million of copies sold, four-book contracts for over $60m. 

More

Book review: All My Puny Sorrows

YOLI is dying to keep her sister Elf alive. It is a full-time job for this author going through a second divorce, a middle-aged mother of teenagers seeking to finally write a novel for grown-ups after a series of Young Adult “rodeo romances”.

More

Book review: Dancing With The Enemy: My Family’s Holocaust Secret

Raised as Roman Catholic, Paul Glaser is shocked to discover a suitcase with his name on it, during a visit to Auschwitz, and he uncovers his father’s Jewish roots and learns about his estranged Aunt Rosie during World War II.

More

Book review: World Gone By

The latest novel from the American crime writer Dennis Lehane concludes a trilogy spanning the years from the end of the First World War to the start of the Second.

More

Children’s books

Dino-Daddy by Mark Sperring ( Bloomsbury €8.80)

More

Book review: Do It Like A Woman... And Change The World

Caroline Criado-Perez

Portobello Books, €16.99; ebook, €13.15

Review: Katie Wright

More

Childrens’ books: I need a wee!

I Need A Wee! by Sue Hendra (Simon and Schuster; €8.80) Alan the bear whoops with glee when he whooshes down the big helter-skelter.

More

Heat of betrayal: Always on the move

When Douglas Kennedy’s half-drunk father called him “a loser” he emptied his bank account and returned to Ireland where he had studied at Trinity. He’s been more or less travelling since. He explains all to Declan Burke. 

More

Beginner’s Pluck: Tim McCormick

Tim taught in India with the VSO after college, then moved to London to study accountancy. Back in Dublin, he joined the National Irish Investment Bank, where he remained until 1990.

More

Wolf Winter won’t easily be erased from the reader’s mind

SET in Swedish Lapland in the winter of 1717, in a time and place so remote as to seem unearthly, Wolf Winter creeps up on the reader stealthily, like a silent fall of snow.

More

Sweetland: One man up against a world that won’t stop changing

SWEETLAND opens with ghostly voices heard against the wail of the foghorn by Moses Sweetland, a fisherman stranded at sea overnight in the fog. The voices belong to a boatload of dying Sri Lankan migrants, set adrift without food or water in the North Atlantic by unscrupulous people-traffickers.

More

A Buzz in the Meadow: A charming manifesto that will leave the reader buzzing

In his second book, Dave Goulson takes us to France in what is part autobiography, part tract, and a rousing read on insects, pets, and pandas, writes Tommy Barker.

More

Book review: At The Water’s Edge

At The Water’s Edge

Sara Gruen

Two Roads, €25.50; ebook, €9.49

Review: Heather Doughty

More

FIRST THOUGHTS: Laub’s latest novel translated into English

Diary of the Fall

Michel Laub (translated by Margaret Jull Costa)

Vintage, £8.99; Kindle: £4.35

Review:

Billy O’Callaghan

More

Book review: The Cellar

Minette Walters

Hammer, €19.50; ebook, €10.99

Review: Phil Robinson

More

A new life revealed for Doreen Finn

Doreen Finn came to writing because one of her teachers challenged her to write a novel. She spoke to Sue Leonard about how that unexpected challenge was a revelation and how it has changed her life.    

More

Children’s books

Once there was a little girl called Emily Brown and an old grey rabbit called Stanley.

More

SJ Watson I presume? Shining a light on a star of domestic noir

SJ Watson’s second novel Second Life deals with all of the layers that makes up an individual. He spoke to Declan Burke about his first domestic noir thriller.    

More

First Thoughts: Massimo Carlotto’s Cocaine

THREE themed short stories by three acclaimed Italian crime/thriller writers – what could go wrong?

More

Beginner’s Pluck: Maria Murphy

In her early 20s Maria was in a folk group, and she started writing lyrics, and some poetry. But it wasn’t until 2004, when she joined a creative writing group that she started taking writing seriously.

More

Book review: Writing from the Frontier

DESRIBED by himself as ‘poor, friendless and joyless’ Anthony Trollope arrived in Ireland in 1841 to work as clerk to an Irish surveyor at a salary of £100 a year.

More

Book review: Hunters In The Dark

Lawrence Osborne’s new novel has much in common with its predecessor, The Ballad Of A Small Player, as a tale of ghosts and gamblers adrift on the edges of South East Asia.

More

Book review: Fetale

AT JUST over 90 pages Jean-Patrick Manchette’s Fatale is a magnificent example of French noir stretched into the realms of art.

More

Book review: Ladybird by Design

The iconic children’s publisher is 100 years old, and Marjorie Brennan wistfully remembers its colourful, moral stories, its fairy tales and its idyllic world of happy families, science and history.

More

Book review: Tanglewood

Dermot Bolger talks to Tony Clayton-Lea about his new book Tanglewood and how he believes that the introduction of free secondary education in the late 1960s was at the root of the 1980s burst of Irish creativity.

More

Book review: The Mountain Story

ON his 18th birthday, Wilfred Truly, better known to everyone he’s ever met as Wolf, takes the tramcar up a southern California mountain with the intention of hiking off trail and leaping to his death from Angel Peak. 

More

Book review: Clasp

THE story of how Doireann Ní Ghríofa started writing poetry six years ago is bizarre but also somewhat fitting for this warm, dreamy and gentle writer who was awarded the Ireland Chair of Poetry Bursary 2014-2015 by Ireland Professor of Poetry, Paula Meehan.

More

Book review: This House Is Not For Sale

It is a truth universally acknowledged that any Nigerian writer who ends up in the United States is still reeling from the after-affects of their vivid childhood. And EC Osondu is no exception.

More

Book review: On Some Faraway Beach

FANS of U2 will probably know the story of how Larry Mullen and later Bono had to repeatedly court Brian Eno to convince him to work with them on changing their sound.

More

Book review: The Killing Of Bobbi Lomax

We’re into the action from page one in Cal Moriarty’s thriller The Killing Of Bobbi Lomax, as cynical detective Marty Sinclair and his partner Al Alvarez rush to the scene of a bombing.

More

Book review: Mockingbird Songs

RJ Ellory puts you deep in the heart of Texas in his new crime thriller Mockingbird Songs — a simple backstory is dealt with quickly enough to put you straight into the main plot.

More

Children’s books

Blown Away by Rob Biddulph (Harper Collins €8.80) tells of Penguin and his brand new kite. 

More

Book review: History of a Suicide

by Jill Bialosky
Granta, €26.85; ebook, €16.10
THEY say blues music is not made to get you into blue humour but to get you out of it. 

More

Book review: The Defence

In the real world Steve Cavanagh is a Belfast lawyer who explained to Declan Burke how an exceptional advocate can convince a jury black is actually white.

More

Book review: The Green Road

Anne Enright’s latest novel The Green Road is set on that great Irish battleground — the family. She spoke to Caroline O’Doherty about the institution and all its foibles — and trying to be an inspiring teacher.

More

Book review: Billie Holiday: The Musician & The Myth

By John Szwed
Cornerstone, €29.50; ebook €14.99

More

Book review: A Song Of Shadows

By John Connolly
Hodder and Staughton

More

Book review: Lock No. 1

Georges Simenon (translated by David Coward)
Penguin Classics, €10.50; ebook, €6.49

More

Book review: All I Know Now: Wonderings And Reflections On Growing Up Gracefully

By Carrie Hope Fletcher
Sphere, €16.99; ebook 9.49
Okay, it’s official: YouTubers are taking over the world. 

More

Book review: Pond

By Claire-Louise Bennett
The Stinging Fly Press; €12.99
AN unnamed woman lives on the edge of a coastal village in the west of Ireland. 

More

Children’s books

All Aboard The Dinosaur Express
by Timothy Knapman and Ed Eaves
(Bloomsbury €8.80.)

More

The Girl on The Train is a one-way ticket to success for Paula Hawkins

Paula Hawkins is glad she took a gamble with The Girl On The Train, writes Tony Clayton-Lea

This story is enriched with multi-media content

More

Book review: The Night Game

Frank Golden

Salmon, €12

More

Book review: Wilful Disregard a Novel about Love

Lena Andersson (translated by Sarah Death)

Picador, €19.50; ebook, €10.20

More

Book review: Alfred Hitchcock

Peter Ackroyd is one of the most productive and elegant biographers writing in English today but is often accused of not uncovering anything new about his subjects. That doesn’t matter, he tells Tony Clayton-Lea

More

The Bear Whispers To Me

Chang Ying-Tai (translated by Darryl Sterk)

Balestier Press, €15.35; Kindle, €12.55

 

More

Book review: Smoke Gets In Your Eyes: And Other Lessons From The Crematorium

Caitlin Doughty Canongate,€20.55; ebook, €13.64

More

Book review: Villa America

American author Liza Klaussmann speaks to Sue Leonard about the toll the creative process can take on the imagination, particularly when writing fiction about factual characters 

More

Book review: The Science Of Happiness

Stefan Klein Scribe Publications, £12.99; ebook, €18.68

More

Book review: Disclaimer

Disclaimer

More

Children’s books

Who Is King? By Beverley Naidoo and Piet GrobIer (Frances Lincoln €18.90). 

More

Book review: The Lives of Women

Christine Dwyer Hickey is a woman in a hurry — she fears she might run out of time before she gets to write all the books she wants to. She spoke to Sue Leonard about her race against time and her latest book.

More

Book review: How Corrupt is Britain?

DAVID WHYTE opens his edited collection, How Corrupt is Britain?, by arguing that “the idea that British institutions are fair and democratic is one of the foundation stones of our self-imagined national heritage”.

More

Book review: The New Wild: Why Invasive Species Will Be Nature’s Salvation

New Scienist stalwart Fred Pearce’s new book is a richly-exemplified and controversial defense of invasive species. 

More

Book review: Outline

“I had come to believe more and more in the virtues of passivity,” claims the narrator of Rachel Cusk’s Outline, “and of living a life as unmarked by self-will as possible.”

More

Book review: The Wolf Border

TENSION runs under the narrative of this fine novel like a river under a cave. 

More

Book review: Inside The O’Briens

Following the success of the big-screen adaptation of Lisa Genova’s debut novel, Still Alice — an exploration of Alzheimer’s disease — the Harvard-educated neuroscientist’s fourth novel, Inside The O’Briens, cements her reputation. 

More

Book review: The Salmon Who Dared To Leap Higher

Novels designed to appeal to both adults and children are doomed because simplistic language disinterests the former group, or contextual complexities confuse the latter. 

More

Book review: Station Eleven

ON A SNOWY winter’s evening in Toronto, a famous actor named Arthur Leander dies on stage during a performance of King Lear. 

More

Children’s books

One Thousand Things by Anna Koveceses
(Frances Lincoln €16.35 HB)
This big colourful book is the perfect introduction to the world of words for pre-school youngsters. 

More

Children’s Books

You Can’t Take An Elephant On The Bus, by Patricia Cleveland (Bloomsbury; €8.80) Elephant yearns to travel, but trying to board the bus is a definite no! 

More

Book Review: The Lost Child

THIS latest work of fiction by the West Indies-born writer and Yale professor is as much a personal journey of discovery as it is a literary gem.

More

Book Review: Adeline: A Novel Of Virginia Woolf

SPANNING 1925 to 1941, this richly imagined novel of Virginia Woolf delves deep into her psyche, drawing perhaps too heavily on the biography written by Hermione Lee, which lends it enormous accuracy.

 

More

Book Review: The Girl Who Couldn’t Stop Arguing

THE key to any good novel is to perfect your main character into someone the reader feels they have got to know. And Melissa Kite hits the nail on the head on that front.

More

FIRST THOUGHTS: Vargas Llosa fails to reach the heights of past

FOR the first three quarters of this 325-page novel, Peruvian master, Mario Vargas Llosa seems to be spinning, in alternating chapters, two quite separate — albeit thematically similar — yarns.

More

BEGINNER’S PLUCK: Carole Gurnett

As a child, Carole wrote long diary entries and letters to anyone who would reply, and as a teenager she wrote short stories. Some were published, and others shortlisted in competitions. 

More

Book Review: Last Night on Earth

JAY has been raised by his mother on a diet of ‘gods, monsters, lambs, virgins and fillums, fillums, fillums.’

More

Book Review: The Moth Snowstorm Nature and Joy

What is the economic value of birdsong, butterflies spring wild flowers, or a rising trout? These are some questions posed in a riveting new book on nature, writes Dick Warner.

More

Book Review: Mollie Cinnamon is Not a Cupcake

A FEW years ago, the writer Sarah Webb was staying in a yurt on Cape Clear Island, off the west Cork coast.

More

Author profile: Life in the fast lane for Irvine Welsh

Irvine Welsh’s new novel, A Decent Ride, follows swaggering taxi driver ‘Juice’ Terry Lawson around Edinburgh. It’s another tale of hard-living in Scotland, even as Welsh mixes with celebrities in the US, writes Richard Fitzpatrick.           

More

The Four Books

Like many of Lianke’s works, The Four Books is unavailable in his native China; unsurprising, given its subject is the murderous stupidity of the 1958-61 ‘Great Leap Forward’ — its massive, avoidable death toll still obfuscated by rulers.

More

A Place Called Winter

Notes From An Exhibition author Patrick Gale’s first historical novel opens rather unnervingly with his protagonist Harry Cane being strapped into a bath.

More

Author profile: Steve Cavanagh

AS a lawyer, Steve has conducted several high profile cases. In 2010, representing a factory worker, he won the largest award for damages in race discrimination in Northern Ireland’s legal history.

More

What Becomes of Us: A voice to the voiceless

Reimagining the role of Irish women in the 1916 Rising opened several doors for Henrietta McKervey and helped her to develop her writing which has won her numerous prizes, writes Sue Leonard.            

More

If you imagine you really know what you’re eating think again

 Joanna Blythman has taken a look at what we eat and how the food industry is often so misleading. Her conclusions killed Richard Fitzpatrick’s appetite    

More

Deadly Intent: Thriller set on the Beara peninsula

ONE of the reasons Irish crime writing took so long to develop as a body of work is Ireland lacked the kind of large, anonymous urban settings where crime fiction tends to thrive. 

More

Forgetting: Myths,Perils And Compensations

Forgetting is an odd thing: Everyone does it, but by definition cannot discuss it in much detail. Dutch psychologist and ‘memory scholar’ Draaisma makes a game attempt to explore this paradox from numerous viewpoints.

More

Children’s books

THOSE PESKY RABBITS by Ciara Flood (Templar €8. 80)

More

Seven madmen get author’s seal of approval in magical Argentina

IMAGINE Dostoevsky and Flann O’Brien had an adventure and you got to hear about it second-hand from Haruki Murakami. That is what it is like to read Roberto Arlt’s 1929 novel Los Siete Locos — or, as it is presented here, The Seven Madmen — a rollicking and prescient dive through the anxieties of an urban Argentina on the cusp of transformation.

More

In the ‘enchanted’ dungeon there is nothing to do but wait

IN the belly of an old prison is a dungeon, an ‘enchanted place’, that houses Death Row inmates, and it is here that York waits out his final months before the lethal injection is administered.

More

Book review: Red Notice How I Became Putin’s No. 1 Enemy

LET’S do a security sweep of the room! No men dressed in black suits speaking into microphones up their sleeves? Check. No femme fatales dressed in silk reaching for their stilettos? Check. 

More

Book review: Glimpses of Ireland’s Past

THE work of the Ordnance Survey in Ireland between 1824 and 1842 was both immense and controversial. 

More

Book review: Soil

We all know we can be our own worst enemies, but in terms of the characters in Soil, that’s a severe understatement.

More

Book review: Morning Sea

The Mediterranean, 2010. As rebels battle loyalists, Farid and his mother flee the wreckage of Tripoli for the coast, pinning their hopes on a trafficker’s rusting boat and the perilous crossing to Italy.

More

Book review: The Martini Shot and other short stories

ALL you ever wanted to know about being on the set of a fledging American TV crimes series but were afraid to ask probably wouldn’t even cut it as a subtitle, but that is effectively what the main story in this new book is about.

More

Book review: The Shut Eye

The Shut Eye
Belinda Bauer
Bantam Press, €19.50,
ebook €10.99

More

Book review: Making Nice

Matt Sumell
Harvill Secker, €19.50;
ebook, €10.99

More

Book review: The Lost and the Blind

The Lost and the Blind
Declan Burke
Severn House, €28.99; ebook, €18.19

More

Children’s Books

All The Wild Wonders. Poems Of Our Earth
Edited by Wendy Cooling.
Illustrated by Piet Grobler (Frances Lincoln; €16.35 HB). 

More

Book review: The Kindness

Polly Samson’s novel The Kindness is built around a family secret — the suicide of a beloved uncle. She tells Sue Leonard about it and what it’s like to write songs for her husband David Gilmour’s band Pink Floyd.

More

Book review: The Shore

American Sara Taylor has, at 24, written a startling debut. Billy O’Callaghan discovers a writer eager to push the boundaries of fiction in a moving but frightening way.

More

Book review: Aquarium

Caitlin, 12, lives alone with her mum Sheri in a subsidised housing complex by Seattle airport, a soulless zone of cargo transports and industrial units. 

More

Book review: Greetings, Hero

BALANCING its outward perspective with an interrogatory approach to the secrets hidden in the human heart and mind, the 15 stories of Aiden O’Reilly’s very fine debut offer the reader a series of candid dispatches from a changing Europe.

More

Book review: Weightless

BILLED as a book that’ll appeal to Mean Girls fans, I was expecting good things from Weightless. 

More

Book review: The Whitstable Pearl Mystery

The title tells you all you need: our heroine — Pearl, naturally — runs a successful Whitstable restaurant.

More

Book review: Something Coming Through

Paul McAuley’s 20th novel is the ultimate bailout narrative. Economic collapse, environmental destruction, terrorism, and political extremism have crippled the world, but help is here in the form of the Jackaroo. 

More

Children’s books

Thank You, Jackson
by Niki and Jude Daly
(Frances Lincoln, €15.10 HB) 

More

Book review: One of Us, The Story of Anders Breivik and the Massacre in Norway

THERE are many times reading One of Usthat you have to stop. Where your stomach cramps. Where you have to catch a breath. Where tears well up and, sometimes, flow.

More

Book review: The Buried Giant

WHAT a conundrum. What a bother. What a pickle and a palaver. Frankly, we need to talk about Kazuo.

More

Book review: The Girl In The Red Coat

It can be hard to make an impact with a first novel, but Kate Hamer’s powerful thriller will certainly cement her name in the literature world.

More

Book review: Before, During, After

RICHARD BAUSCH’s last novel, Peace, was a major critical success, and years ago novelist Richard Ford championed him by writing the introduction to Bausch’s terrific book of short stories, Aren’t You Happy For Me?

More

Book review: Reasons To Stay Alive

IN an author’s note to his 2013 novel, The Humans, Matt Haig said it was partly a metaphor for his mental illness.

More

Book review: The Temporary Gentleman

SEBASTIAN BARRY’S latest novel, his eighth (just published in paperback), opens with a bang: the World War II torpedoing of a ship carrying British officers to Africa.

More

Book review: Langer Homicide

ANY book that manages to introduce a classic hard-boiled LA-based private investigator; a plea for help; as well as the expression “it’s fiercebad” in the first dozen pages is surely a good thing, like.

More

Book review: Style

Critically acclaimed author, Joseph Connolly, presents a dystopian vision of a future in which celebrity and scandal become entwined.

More

Children’s books

Finding A Voice
by Kim Hood (O’Brien €7.99)

More

Book review: Weightless

Weightless
Sarah Bannan
Bloomsbury Circus, €19.50; Kindle, €9.06 

More

Book review: Breadline Britain: The Rise Of Mass Poverty

Breadline Britain: The Rise Of Mass Poverty
Stewart Lansley and Joanna Mack
Oneworld Publications, €14.99;
ebook, €15.98

More

Book review: A Killing Winter

A Killing Winter
Tom Callaghan
Quercus, €20.85; ebook, €12.99

More

Book review: The Heart of Man

The Heart of Man
Jón Kalman Stefánsson
MacLehose Press; €23.60

More

Book review: The Fishermen

The Fishermen
Chigozie Obioma
One, £14.99; ebook, £4.19

More

Book review: All Our Names

All Our Names
Dinaw Mengestu
Sceptre, £8.99; Kindle: £5.98

More

Children’s books

Behind The Walls
by Nicola Pierce (O’Brien; €7.99)
The walls in question are those of Derry during the siege of 1689, and the story centres around the exploits of brothers Daniel and Robert Sherrard, as they strive to hold the city against the invading force of King James. 

More

Book review: Neither Unionist Nor Nationalist: The 10th (Irish) Division in the Great War

Stephen Sandford Irish Academic Press, €24.95 
AMONG the great battles of World War I none was more sorrowful than Gallipoli. 

More

Book review: A Shadow in the Yard

Liz McManus Ward River Press, €16.99; Kindle, €6.72
Liz McManus: “Retirement is blissful, it’s like being young again. “It was about civil rights, not nationalism 

More

Book review: Melnitz

Charles Lewinsky Atlantic Books, €20.99; ebook, €12.53
Hailed by critics as Switzerland’s One Hundred Years Of Solitude, this epic family saga, from Swiss author and screenwriter, Charles Lewinksy, is finally published in English — nine years after its original release in German.

More

Book review: Arab Jazz

Karim Miske Translated by Sam Gordon MacLehose, €20.99; ebook, €12.99
This French thriller is a timely tale of religious extremists and corrupt cops running up against each other in inner-city Paris.

More

Book review: The Laughing Monsters

Denis Johnson Harvill & Secker, €15.99; ebook, €10.99
ROLAND Nair, a former NATO spy apparently reactivated, arrives in Freetown, the sweltering, crumbling capital of Sierra Leone, to meet a Ghanaian mercenary, Michael Adriko, who is an old adventuring comrade. 

More

Book review: This Divided Island: Stories From The Sri Lankan War

Samanth Subramanian
Atlantic Books, £14.99; ebook, £5.99
Sri Lanka conjures up images of white beaches and blissful backpacker adventures. 

More

Book review: Blue is the Night

Eoin McNamee Faber, €19.40
THERE’S A short line in Eoin McNamee’s Blue is the Night that could serve as a calling card for the trilogy it completes. 

More

Book review: Second Life

SJ Watson
Doubleday, €14.50
AS THE title suggests, this is a psychological thriller based on a woman’s shadow life.

More

Books for children

The World War Il Tales-the Apple Spy by Terry Deary (A&C BLACK €6.30)
Teacher Miss McLennan loves reading stories to her pupils, so when twins Jamie and Marie disrupt the class she sends them home. 

More

Book review: Border Angels

by Anthony Quinn
Head of Zeus, £16.99

More

Book review: The Utopia Experiment

by Dylan Evans
Picador, €15.99 

More

Book review: Reading The World: Confessions Of A Literary Explorer

by Ann Morgan
Harvill Secker, £16.99;
ebook, £6.99

More

Book review: Bark

by Lorrie Moore
Faber & Faber,
€10.99; email, €9.09

More

Book review: Inherent Vice

by Thomas Pynchon
Vintage Books, £8.99;
Kindle: Not Available

More

Book review: The Kind Worth Killing

by Peter Swanson
Faber & Faber,
€22.50, ebook €8.47

More

Book review: The Illuminations

by Andrew O’Hagan
Faber & Faber, €26.99;
ebook. €15.99

More

Book review: The Village Effect

by Susan Pinker
Atlantic Books,
€18.99; ebook, €12.53

More

Children’s books

The Dawn Chorus
written and illustrated by Suzanne Barton
(Bloomsbury; €8.80) 

More

Book review: The Great Race

The Great Race
David Hill
Little, Brown, £25 

More

Book review: Quite a Good Time to Be Born: A Memoir: 1935-1975

Quite a Good Time to Be Born: A Memoir: 1935-1975
David Lodge
Harvill Secker, €27.00

More

Book review: Told Again

Walter de la Mare (with a new introduction by Philip Pullman)
Princeton University Press, £16.99; Kindle, £12.34

More

Book review: Wayfaring Stranger

Wayfaring Stranger
James Lee Burke
Orion (€20.85, hb)

More

Book review: Holy Cow

Holy Cow
David Duchovny
Headline, €29.50;
ebook. €7.49

More

Book review: A Place For Us

A Place For Us
Harriet Evans Headline, €20.85;
ebook, €11.95

More

Book review: Cameron’s Coup: How The Tories Took Britain To The Brink

Cameron’s Coup: How The Tories Took Britain To The Brink
Polly Toynbee and David Walker
Guardian Faber Publishing, €14.99;
ebook, €7.49

More

Book review: Time and Time Again

Time and Time Again
Ben Elton
Bantam Press: €16.99;
Kindle, €3.58

More

Books for children

The Hog, The Shrew And The Hullabaloo
by Julia Copus and Eunyoung Seo
(Faber and Faber; €8.80) 

More

Book review: The Girl on The Train

Paula Hawkins tells Sue Leonard that the success of The Girl on The Train will allow her quit journalism.

More

Book review: The Italians

Italy gave us the Roman empire and the Renaissance two of the most influential forces in European history. Has this legacy coloured Italians’ perception of themselves and their place in the world, wonders Marjorie Brennan.

More

Book review: Cryptocurrency

Cryptocurrency
Paul Vigna and Michael Casey
Bodley Head, €22.35;
ebook €14.99

More

Book review: Etta And Otto And Russell And James

Etta And Otto And Russell And James
Emma Hooper
Simon & Schuster, €29.50;
ebook €19.50

More

Book review: Gone

Gone
Rebecca Muddiman
Mulholland Books, £13.99;
ebook £7.99

More

Book review: Death Sentences

Edited by Otto Penzler
Head of Zeus, €29.80 HB

More

Book review: The Room

Jonas Karlsson
Hogarth, €14.99;
ebook, €8.99

More

Book review: A Spool of Blue Thread

A Spool of Blue Thread
Anne Tyler
Chatto & Windus, €15.99; ebook, €12.99

More

Children’s books

Never Tickle A Tiger By Pamela Buchart (Bloomsbury; €8.80)
Hard Nuts Of History, Kings And Queens by Tracey Turner (A& C Black; €6.30)
The Binding by Jenny Alexander (Bloomsbury; €7.55) 

More

Book review: The Bletchley Girls

Real secret of Bletchley were the girls who worked there, writes Hannah Stephenson.

More

First Thoughts: An impressive book by Allie Murray

BOUNTIFUL, the début novel of Allie Murray, a native of County Waterford, now living in Rathcormac, elects to shine a light on the many deceits, conspiracies and undercurrents that tend to shape life in any number of Irish villages, says Billy O’Callaghan.

More

Johnny Cash, from rags to rich

SINGER Johnny Cash burst onto the music scene in June, 1955, when his double A-side ‘Hey Porter’ and ‘Cry, Cry, Cry’ reached no 14 in the US country charts.

More

Julian Baggini challenges our beliefs about food

Julian Baggini’s mission is to make us think about what we eat and to learn more about it by exposing some of our absurd beliefs about food production, sourcing and cooking. Tony Clayton-Lea enjoyed the repast.

More

Book review: Dead Girl Walking

This long-awaited return of Jack Parlabane sees the journalist down-on-his-luck and desperate for work, when he gets a call from the sister of an old friend, says Bridie Pritchard.

More

Scandinavian crime novels light up dark days

Declan Burke takes a look at some recent additions to the increasingly popular casebook of Scandinavian crime novels.

More

Book review: The Invisible Library

The Invisible Library opens with the theft of a book from a magic boarding school — a sort of heist on Hogwarts that immediately sets the tone, writes Stephen Wood.

More

Book review: Age, Sex, Location

The dating world has never been straightforward, but with the advent of online dating sites, the popularity of speed dating and singles nights, not to mention Tinder, it’s more difficult to navigate than ever before.

More