Tanora lives to fizz another day

CORKONIANS across the world breathed a collective sigh of relief last night after drinks giant Coca-Cola confirmed it will continue to make the iconic fizzy drink Tanora.

A determined campaign by the Tanora faithful, which included a Facebook petition, has ensured the future of a drink which has become as synonymous with Cork as the Shandon Bells, Beamish, Murphys and tripe and drisheen.

It isn’t all good news for fans of the popular mineral, however, as Coca-Cola has confirmed consumers will no longer be able to buy the pub-size bottles, which are being phased out with immediate effect, or the cans, which will be phased out from June.

Rumours have been circulating for some time about the future of the drink but Coca-Cola HBC Ireland last night reassured consumers that Tanora’s future is secure.

“Two pack sizes, the 200ml glass bottle and 330ml can, are being phased out due to low levels of demand, but the popular two-litre take-home pack and the 500ml on-the-go pack will remain available throughout the marketplace, to be enjoyed by Tanora’s loyal consumer,” a spokesperson said.

The tangerine-flavoured mineral was introduced by John Daly & Co, a former tea, wine and spirit merchants based on Cork’s Kyrls Quay, as far back as the 1930s.

It was distributed to pubs and shops across the city and county and became one of the Cork’s most iconic products.

When the brand was bought by Coca-Cola, its distribution was extended across Munster. But the drink was rarely available anywhere else in the country.

When soccer legend Denis Irwin played for Manchester United his mother would send him Tanora from Cork.

The drink was also immortalised in the award-winning play Disco Pigs, when Pig orders: ‘Two battur burgurs! Two sauce! Two chips! Two peas! Two Tanora!’

But after rumours about Tanora’s future emerged, over 1,300 people signed up to a Facebook page to save it.

That campaign was bolstered when Fine Gael senator and Tanora fan Jerry Buttimer voiced his concerns on his Facebook page. He spent five years in Maynooth in the 1980s studying for the priesthood and led a campaign in 1989 to get a supermarket to stock Tanora for students in Maynooth.

“To me, it’s part of Cork,” he said.

Another Tanora fan, Coal Quay publican Con Dennehy, described it as a “uniquely Cork” product and said it would be a shame if it was discontinued.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

Email Updates

Receive our lunchtime briefing straight to your inbox

More in this Section

Garda boss Nóirín O’Sullivan left isolated by Fianna Fáil position

Rescue 116: Drones aid search for two missing men off Mayo coast

Fianna Fáil plans emergency powers to tackle the housing crisis

Ministers raised fears of Magdalene redress cost in 2011


Breaking Stories

Sinn Féin set to publish motion of no confidence in Garda Commissioner

Fire Brigade tackle blaze in Wicklow

Latest: Body of woman found in apartment on Cork northside removed for post-mortem

Colleagues' 'hearts and thoughts' with family of Coast Guard who died at sea

Lifestyle

Meet the US firefighter running the Cork City Marathon with his severely ill daughter

'You’re doing phenomenally well with brilliant men; why wouldn’t you want brilliant women too?'

Damien Enright: The fascinating Armoured Ground Crickets are perfect look-alikes for horror-film aliens

Jess Kavanagh is putting some real bite in her Barq

More From The Irish Examiner