Renowned poet O’Grady dies

The internationally renowned Limerick-born poet Desmond O’Grady has passed away after suffering a heart attack.

Desmond O'Grady: Lived in Kinsale for past 25 years.

Mr O’Grady, who was in his late 70s, was educated in Roscrea before leaving Ireland during the 1950s to teach and write in Paris, Rome, and the US.

He became a teaching fellow at Harvard University where he took his MA and PhD in Celtic languages and literatures and comparative studies. He also taught at the American University in Cairo and the University of Alexandria, Egypt.

From the late 1950s to the mid-1970s, while teaching in Rome, he was a founder member of the European Community of Writers, European editor of The Transatlantic Review, and organised the Spoleto International Poetry Festival and played the Irish poet part in Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita.

A member of Aosdána, he was the 2004 recipient of the Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship.

Daughter Deirdre paid tribute to her father, saying he leaves behind a life’s work that includes a large catalogue of publications of prose, poems, and translations. She said he died after suffering a heart attack in Cork, having been in ill health for the last few years.

The funeral of Desmond O’Grady will be held in Kinsale, where he lived for the last 25 years of his life.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

More in this Section

Solicitor for Hickey: It isn’t murder

Rose of Tralee ‘not made for modern political beliefs’ says winner

Full life of Peter Barry remembered at dignified ceremony

Offaly's Niall McNamee ‘Recovery was the best thing I’ve ever done’


Breaking Stories

Teenager put on bail as there is no place to hold him at Oberstown

More than 300 people waiting for a hospital bed

Gardaí arrest man and recover property thought be stolen in burglaries

Belfast school evacuated due to bomb scare

Lifestyle

Get a Fair Deal with costs of care homes for elderly

Pablo Escobar’s life on the line in Narcos season two

How to buy the perfect laptop for college

Blurring the lines between humanity and machines

More From The Irish Examiner