Public warned against US church’s industrial-strength bleach ‘miracle cure’

Patients have been warned not to take a "miracle" cure for serious conditions sold by a controversial US church coming to Ireland this weekend, as the product is industrial-strength bleach.

Genesis II Church claims its “miracle mineral solution”, also known as MMS, can “remove” cancer, autism, HIV, malaria and other serious conditions.

However, it has been banned in the US, Canada and England after watchdogs warned it is an “industrial-strength bleach” that can cause “life-threatening reactions”.

The Health Products Regulatory Authority, formerly the Irish Medicines Board, and the Food Safety Authority of Ireland issued a similar alert last night after being informed by the Irish Examiner of a seminar promoting the product.

Genesis II Church is holding the event in Monkstown, Dublin, tomorrow and Sunday for its “miracle mineral solution”, with attendees asked to pay a €295 compulsory donation. The church describes itself as a “non-religious” US health group set up in 2006 and based in the Dominican Republic. It has a number of Irish members.

While a group spokesperson claimed the MMS seminar is about “water purification”, its own advertisements and website state it is about MMS, which “can remove cancers, heart disease, diabetes, malaria and auto-immune dysfunctions”.

Genesis II Church’s founder, Jim Humble, claims he discovered MMS while helping a malaria sufferer in a Guyana rainforest in 1996, and says it is administered by “290 people in over 60 countries”.

In reality, MMS is 28% sodium chlorite drops mixed into water, and becomes chlorine dioxide (industrial-strength bleach) when “activated” by a food-grade acid like citrus fruit, as advised by the group.

While Genesis II Church claims chlorine dioxide is safe for consumption because it is used to disinfect some water systems, the US Environmental Protection Agency has warned it is toxic to people exposed to it over extended periods of time.

Those attending the seminar this weekend are asked to pay a compulsory donation of €295 to learn how to make MMS and to be “registered” as someone who can administer it to other people.

However, while the church sells MMS in unregulated online stores, it is not licensed by any national health body and has been banned in the US, Canada and England after complaints and a BBC expose.

When contacted, Genesis II Church’s Reverend Mark Kishon Christopher said the Dublin event is a “water purification” seminar — a claim the group has previously been accused of using to avoid drug safety rules.

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

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