Health authority has no objection to incinerator

THE Health and Safety Authority (HSA) has sent documentation to An Bord Pleanála informing the board they have no issue with the granting of planning permission for Indaver’s planned 240,000 tonne municipal and hazardous waste incinerator at Cork Harbour.

In a letter, seen by the Irish Examiner, the HSA informs the planning board that Indaver has provided sufficient information on “consequence and risk assessment” to allow it to “not advise against the granting of planning permission in the context of major accident hazards”. The HSA is due to give evidence to An Bord Pleanála today at the ongoing oral hearing into the development.

The planned €140m waste-to-energy plant is earmarked a Seveso industry as it is a high-risk chemical site which handles specific chemicals or substances, such as methanol, which if not handled properly could give rise to a major accident. Under Seveso regulations, the HSA must give land use advice to the planning authority so public risk is minimised. There are 90 Seveso sites in Ireland and the Indaver site is deemed a lower-risk Seveso site.

Last night, a Cork Harbour for a Safe Environment (CHASE) spokes-woman said the community would “this week put paid to any claims that there is no cause for concern in the event of a major accident or explosion at the planned site”.

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