Anti-war group fights Shannon troops plan

An anti-war group has warned of further protests at Shannon Airport after the chairman of the Shannon Airport Authority said the facility will specifically target US troop business.

Rose Hynes told the Oireachtas Committee on Transport and Communications that Shannon will continue to operate 24-hours to accommodate troops.

“Military traffic has been in the DNA of Shannon for many years... it’s lucrative and we are certainly going to go after it as much as possible,” she said.

However, Shannon watch spokesman John Lannon said: “US military traffic that traditionally passed through Shannon Airport... were obliged to be unarmed, not even engaged in military exercises, and no munitions were allowed on their aircraft”.

He added: In Oct 2001 this situation changed. Armed US troops on their way to war in Afghanistan, and later Iraq, were invited by the Irish Government to transit Shannon Airport, in breach of international laws on neutrality.

“By claiming that military traffic is “in the DNA of Shannon” she [Ms Hynes] is doing a grave disservice to the very many people living and working in Shannon who want nothing to do with unnecessary warfare.”

© Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

Email Updates

Receive our lunchtime briefing straight to your inbox

More in this Section

Cork SVP has no cash for first time in 40 years

Woman aged 103 among 9,000 patients left on trolleys last month

Fire-damaged theatre may not reopen for 2 years

Four major cities to ban use of diesel vehicles in bid to improve air quality


Breaking Stories

Fianna Fáil indicates support for charge on excessive use of water

Tests carried out on guns after gangland killing

Concern for Pádraig Pearse's final letter of surrender which looks set to leave Ireland

VIDEO: Firefighters brave exploding oil tank to avert tragedy in Cork

Lifestyle

Top eight foodie gifts for Christmas under €10

How to be a better person in the digital age

Dublin Strolls provides a guide to the rich interiors of the city's architecture

The people behind the gardens

More From The Irish Examiner