'60 stone' UK teen cut free from home

A specially constructed ramp at the house in Aberdare, south Wales which was used to take  teenager Georgia Davis out of her home into a reinforced ambulance.

A chronically obese teenager cut free from her home by workmen after she grew too big to go outside remained in hospital in Britain today.

Georgia Davis, 19, weighed up to 60st by the time she was urgently rescued from the house that had become her prison.

Neighbours claimed today that the teenager, from Aberdare in the South Wales valleys, had not been seen outside for up to three years.

In that time her weight ballooned to such proportions it is believed it became a serious threat to her life.

Dozens of neighbours watched as Miss Davis was carried out of her home on a specially constructed stretcher yesterday.

More than 40 police, firefighters, paramedics, social services personnel, council officers and builders worked together to free her.

Although unwell she was still conscious and reportedly flanked by a medical officer, nurse and social worker as she was carried out.

Miss Davis became a minor celebrity when she took part in an American bootcamp series and slimmed down to a healthier weight and more manageable size.

But neighbours claimed today that her disappearance from view coincided with a new bout of weight gain around three years ago.

“I think the TV programme helped to start with but then she was under a lot of pressure to keep it off,” said neighbour Jane Price, 52.

“I don’t think I’d seen her for about three years. It’s such a shame because she has so much to live for at her age.

“I know her mother and stepfather are both ill so it has been a very difficult time for them all.

“You have got to feel sorry for someone who has not set foot outside their home for so long.”

She said a large team of workmen had arrived at the teenager’s home the day before she was freed to plan the extraction.

Neighbours had noticed food staff coming and going, with everything from burgers to an array of Indian and other takeaways delivered on a regular basis.

“She lived up here a long time. I think she was still at primary school when she moved here,” Mrs Price said.

“She was a big girl then and has always been big. But I understand that she was confined to bed so someone must have been bringing her food in that situation.”

Jason O’Sullivan, 18, another neighbour, said he had only ever seen the teenager once in the time he had lived in the area.

“Yeah, can’t say I know her because she was never outside. It must be terrible being inside all the time,” he said.

“It’s just mad getting into that state.”

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