Laudrup: Nani sending off 'a very poor decision'

Swansea manager and former Real Madrid great Michael Laudrup believes referee Cuneyt Cakir made “a very poor decision” when he sent off Nani during Manchester United’s Champions League exit.

United were leading 2-1 on aggregate against Spanish giants Real thanks to a Sergio Ramos own goal, when Turkish official Cakir showed the Portuguese winger a red card for a high challenge on Alvaro Arbeloa.

Nani was in the process of trying to control a ball dropping over his shoulder and did not even appear to be aware of Arbeloa’s presence prior to making contact with the Spaniard.

United went on to lose 3-2 on aggregate and Laudrup said: “I watched the game the other day and I am not a supporter of Manchester United or Real Madrid, but it should never, ever have been a red card.

“A yellow card maybe, but a red card? Absolutely not.

“I don’t think it matters whether it’s a referee in the Premier League, La Liga or a Champions League game.

“It was just a bad decision. Referees are human and make mistakes – there is no problem with that – and sometimes it goes against you.

“But we are allowed to say when a referee gives a poor performance, and that was a very poor decision.”

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