Truce agreed in gay kiss controversy at Cork pub

A resolution has been reached in the in the recent controversy which occurred when a gay couple were allegedly thrown out of a Cork city bar last Saturday night.

The two male Cork Institute of Technology students said they were approached by a bouncer at the Old Oak on Oliver Plunkett Street and issued with a warning after sharing a brief kiss, and were later ejected when they kissed again.

However, both parties have said that they now wish to move on from the incident.

“After deliberations and discussions, both parties accepted and conceded that mistakes were made by all involved,” said a joint statement.

“The Old Oak apologised for any offence which was taken, but stressed that no offence whatsoever was meant or intended as we are not and never have been anti Gay.

“Equally the couple involved, who wish to remain anonymous, accepted that they could have handled matters in a better way.

“Both parties look forward to continuing good relations and custom.”

The controversy sparked an internet campaign, including a protest page on Facebook, which quickly attracted more than 5,000 members.

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