Study: Childhood obesity linked to sugar intake of pregnant mothers

Too much sugar during pregnancy can increase the likelihood of childhood obesity, according to a joint study by University College Dublin and the National Maternity Hospital.

The research found that eating foods like white bread and fruit juice during pregnancy can increase the chances of giving birth to a larger baby.

With recent international studies linking higher birth weight to later childhood obesity, researchers are asking mums-to-be to watch their weight before and during pregnancy.

Women with high blood sugar at 28 weeks of pregnancy were three and a half times more likely to give birth to babies weighing more than nine pounds and 15 ounces than those women with the lowest levels of blood sugar.

The average weight of a newborn baby is between six and eight pounds.


Email Updates

Receive our lunchtime briefing straight to your inbox

More in this Section

Female pedestrian dies following collision in Belfast

Social Protection Minister says she will pay back €16k top up

PSNI investigating after bodies of two men found in Co Antrim

Brexit 'will have bigger impact on Anglo Irish relations than Easter Rising'


Today's Stories

Unions a barrier to health reform: Minister

Bunker down: Skibb ideal ‘safe haven’ in nuclear war

Varadkar: UK enjoys good EU trade deals

Nursing home plan may alleviate the housing crisis

Lifestyle

Classical Review: Ensemble Marsyas

Album Review: Grizzly Bear - Painted Ruins

In Vogue: Changing of the guard at iconic fashion magazine

Lidl and Heidi Klum - has the High Street reached peak collaboration?

More From The Irish Examiner