Legal action against Cardinal Brady settled

Cardinal Sean Brady made an undisclosed settlement today with the victim of notorious paedophile priest Fr Brendan Smyth.

Cardinal Brady, the head of the Catholic Church in Ireland, was sued by Brendan Boland, one of two teenagers he swore to secrecy in 1975 following his investigation into their allegations of abuse by Fr Smyth.

The 50-year-old from Co Louth launched the case against Cardinal Brady in his personal and official capacities, along with the diocese of Kilmore and Smyth’s Norbertine Order.

The settlement was agreed shortly before a date for hearing was due to be fixed at the High Court in Dublin.

Mr Justice John Quirke struck out the case today.

While the settlement is not confidential, Mr Boland – who was not in court - has decided not to disclose the amount.

In June last year Cardinal Brady reached an out-of-court settlement, said to be worth more than €250,000, with the other teenager whose abuse by Smyth he investigated in 1975.

It was the High Court action by Marie McCormack which led to disclosures in March last year that Cardinal Brady had been involved in canonical investigations into abuse allegations against Smyth in 1975 which involved the two young people.


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