Citizen has no legal standing to take promissory note case, court rules

The High Court has today ruled that businessman David Hall does not have the legal standing to challenge the State's use of promissory notes to bail out Anglo Irish Bank and other financial institutions.

High Court President Nicholas Kearns said that the case should have been brought and may still be brought by a member of the Dáil.

Mr Hall took this case as a businessman and a taxpayer in a bid to stop the State paying promissory notes amounting to €31bn to IBRC and EBS.

He argued that the Minister for Finance adopted inappropriate procedures in issuing the notes without first having a Dáil vote on the matter.

However, Mr Kearns has ruled that he was not the man to take this challenge as he does not have the legal standing and as a taxpayer he has not been prejudiced any more than anyone else.

He has found the action should have been and could still be brought by a member of the Dáil.

Three TDs, Independents Shane Ross and Stephen Donnelly, and People Before Profit's Joan Collins, who attended a hearing to let the court know they were supporting David Hall may now launch a case, if Mr Hall decides not to appeal.

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