Shakespeare book trial

A BRITISH man was facing jail yesterday after being found guilty of handling stolen goods following the disappearance of a rare William Shakespeare manuscript dating from 1623.

Raymond Scott, a 53-year-old antiques dealer, was discovered after taking the book to staff at the world-renowned Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC in 2008 and asking them to verify that it was genuine.

The First Folio, a collection of Shakespeare’s plays worth about €1.2 million, was taken from Durham University in northeast England in 1998 but Scott was cleared of stealing.

He was however found guilty of handling stolen goods and removing stolen property from the Britain.

Prosecutors alleged he was in debt due to his lavish lifestyle, which included driving a Ferrari and staying in luxury hotels around the world, and tried to sell the book in order to clear it.

Newcastle Crown Court heard that Scott had told police he discovered the book, which has been badly damaged, in Cuba.

Scott was remanded in custody ahead of his sentencing at a later date.


Lifestyle

Esther N McCarthy paints a pretty picture with her January picks, along with cool ideas for fridges and lunchboxesWishlist: Fridges and lunchboxes make our list of January picks

Maturity isn’t a good fit for every rapper (see: Kanye’s bedraggled coming-to-Jesus phase). But through 2018 it was working a treat for former bad boy — and Ariana Grande’s ex — Mac Miller. But then his story turned to tragedy as that September, the 26 year-old died of an accidental drug overdose.Review: Mac Miller - Circles

The year is 2399, and Jean-Luc Picard dreams of his old ship, destroyed three decades ago, and his dear friend, the android Data, dead 20 years now. Dreams turn to nightmare, and Picard awakens, old and defeated, in his French château.Review: Star Trek: Picard

A Polish prisoner carefully checks there are no guards around before he enters one of the SS cloakrooms in Auschwitz. He takes out a hidden vial and quickly sprinkles its contents on the collars of those hated uniforms, before slipping out again. Within two weeks some of the Germans had come down with the typhoid that was wiping out so many of the prisoners.Gripping account of the hero who volunteered to go to Auschwitz

More From The Irish Examiner