Quirky World: Heart-warming tale as fans show their mettle for Leonardo DiCaprio

Some of the stranger stories from around the world

RUSSIA: Residents of a town in Russia’s Far East have been donating their gold and silver for something near and dear to their hearts: Leonardo DiCaprio.

More than 100 DiCaprio fans in the Siberian town of Yakutia have donated jewellery and precious metals to make a statue — based on an Academy Award — for the film star who is nominated as best actor for his role in The Revenant.

Sardana Savvina, a member of the Oscar to Leo! initiative, said the group is hopeful that DiCaprio will walk away with two awards this year: a statue from Yakutia and a bona fide Oscar.

DiCaprio, whose grandmother was Russian, is extremely popular in the country.

Keep it in

ENGLAND:

A primary school head teacher has written to parents asking them to stop their children from urinating in the playground.

Kay Church said a “small number of pupils” had been seen relieving themselves on school grounds as their parents picked them up at the end of the day.

Ms Church, executive head teacher of Hannah More Infant School and Grove Junior School in Nailsea, Somerset, called the behaviour “totally unacceptable”. She included an item about “toilet etiquette” in last week’s school newsletter.

Hitting the right note

ENGLAND:

Scientists have developed new technology to help lovestruck partners hit the right note on Valentine’s Day greetings.

Toneapi.com, a new tool created by Adoreboard, a data analytics firm based at Queen’s University Belfast, can assist people agonising over how to sign off cards, write texts, or compile posts on social media.

The language analysis technology detects up to 24 different types of emotions through the use of mathematical algorithms. They range from admiration to joy, and maybe even rage — depending on the current state of a relationship.

In the rough

ENGLAND:

A pilot was forced to make an emergency landing when the propeller dropped off his 80-year-old plane at 2,500 feet.

He made a distress call to Newquay Airport before finding a landing strip next to a golf course near Polzeath, Cornwall, according to the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB).

The accident report stated that the pilot performed a “successful forced landing” of the Aeronca C3, a light plane built in the US in 1936. The pilot, who was the only person on board, escaped uninjured from the incident on October 14 last year.

Bounced around

USA:

The Utah Red Cross plans to honour a year-old red kangaroo that works as a therapy animal at a Salt Lake City veterans home.

Charlie is one of about a dozen therapy animals at William E Christoffersen Veterans home. The marsupial has also visited special education classes and hospice care facilities.

Charlie weighs 30lb but is expected to grow quickly, reaching about 5ft 2in and 125lb. That means he will not be able to stay in the veterans home much longer.

Bernie Kindred bonded with the bounder when he moved into the home about a year ago and told KUTV-TV he shares liquorice with Charlie.

Piece of cake

RUSSIA:

A prominent Russian opposition figure says he has been attacked— with a cake.

Mikhail Kasyanov told the Russian news agency Interfax that about 10 men of “non-Slavic appearance” entered a Moscow restaurant where he was dining and slammed a cake in his face. Mr Kasyanov, who is chairman of the opposition PARNAS party, said the men also shouted insults.


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