Quirky World: David Bowie urges Scotland to stay with UK

PM's 'cry of joy' over Bowie plea

ENGLAND: British prime minister David Cameron said he let out a “cry of joy” when David Bowie called for Scots to stay part of the UK.

The singer delivered his unexpected message, in which he urged “Scotland, stay with us”, in a note read out by model Kate Moss at the Brit Awards.

Cameron told the BBC: “I was watching the Brit Awards and when I saw Kate Moss leap to the stage and utter those words, I have to say I did let out a cry of joy because I’m sure that maybe someone like David Bowie might be able to reach parts of Scotland that perhaps I can’t.”

Legendary spelling bee runs out of words

USA: After 19 rounds in a Missouri county’s annual spelling bee last weekend, only two of the 25 contestants who started remained.

Several hours and 47 rounds later, an 11-year-old and her 13-year-old adversary had used up all of the available words, forcing organisers of the Jackson County Spelling Bee to halt the showdown.

“It was legendary,” said Mary Olive Thompson, co-coordinator of the contest.

Sophia Hoffman, a fifth-grader at Highland Park Elementary School in the Kansas City suburb of Lee’s Summit, and Kush Sharma, a seventh-grader at Frontier School of Innovation in Kansas City, buzzed through the list of words provided by the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Then they ran through a list of about 20 additional words bee officials picked out of their Merriam-Webster’s 11th Edition during the lunch break.

But bee officials decided to stop because they worried one speller might get a tough word and the other a relatively easy one. Plus, Thompson said, at “about 2 o’clock, I think we were all really tired.”

“Scherzo,” ‘fantoccini” and “intaglio” were among the words Kush correctly spelled, while Sophia nailed words such as “schadenfreude, “mahout” and “barukhzy.”

The contest will resume March 8.

CHINA: A bank clerk was caught on CCTV laughing at an incompetent bank robber who threatened her with a meat cleaver — despite the fact that she was hidden behind an unbreakable security barrier.

Robber De Ke, 28, also stopped mid-robbery in Shanghai to answer a his mobile phone, telling the caller to ring back later.

Clerk Rong Ku, 41, told local media: “I might have taken it seriously if he’d had a gun as you never know really if the security glass will stop a bullet, but I knew he had no chance of getting through with a meat cleaver.

“He said ‘this is a robbery’ in a really quiet voice and then asked me to hold on while he took a phone call.”

As he shouted down the phone, a security guard intervened, allowing another customer to disarm the robber before police arrived.

Car found 40 years later, but not the owner

Weird Flavours

ENGLAND: Piri Piri pigeon with sour cream, cheesy grasshoppers, and Thai spiced pickled chicken feet, are some of the flavours suggested by crisp lovers as part of Walkers’ Do Us A Flavour campaign.

Roast pork and toffee apple, afternoon tea, cheese and cucumber, and haggis with a whiskey sour cream, are also among the suggestions.

People have until March 5 to submit a flavour suggestion at www.walkers.co.uk and have the chance to win £1m (€1.21m).

Just don't go

USA: A traffic reporter has gained worldwide attention for his dramatic on-air parody of a Disney movie song.

Bob Herzog of Cincinnati TV station WKRC, changed Let It Go, sung by Princess Elsa in the animated film Frozen, to Just Don’t Go to reference the winter weather.

As images of cars skidding on ice and traffic conditions play, Herzog dramatically sings lines like: “I must share what dispatchers say, all the traction’s gone. School’s closed or at least they’re on a delay.”


Lifestyle

Kya deLongchamps advises us to research, plan and keep our heads during online auctionsHow to keep your head during an online auction

Columnist and trained counsellor Fiona Caine offers guidance to a woman who’s growing resentful of her widowed mum’s needy behaviour.Ask a counsellor: My mother is so clingy since losing my dad – what can I do?

Amid all the uncertainty, this year’s London Fashion Week has quietly set about its task of asking how women will dress for the decade ahead, writes Paul McLauchlan.The trends you'll be wearing next season - from London Fashion Week

More From The Irish Examiner