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Foul play by council causes a bit of a stink

ENGLAND:

A local authority has come under fire for using the slogan “No Shit Sherlock!” in an anti-dog mess poster campaign.

Sandwell Council hopes the hard-hitting initiative will bolster its zero tolerance approach to dog-fouling.

One of two “bold” posters featuring graphic images of dog mess shows a long-eared hound wearing a Sherlock Holmes-style deerstalker hat, and threatens law-breakers with a £75 (€90) fine.

More than 800 complaints about dog-fouling were received by the council last year and the posters are being put up in various locations around the Black Country borough, including parks, open spaces and dog mess hot spots.

SCULPTURE ’IS PANTS’

USA: A remarkably lifelike sculpture of a man sleep-walking in nothing but his underpants at a US women’s college has triggered an online student petition calling for it to be removed.

The sculpture is a “source of apprehension, fear, and triggering thoughts regarding sexual assault” for many, according to the petition, signed by nearly 300.

The work is part of an exhibit by sculptor Tony Matelli at Wellesley College, Massachusetts.

A joint statement issued by president H Kim Bottomly and museum director Lisa Fischman says: “The very best works of art have the power to stimulate deeply personal emotions and to provoke unexpected new ideas, and this sculpture is no exception.”

NEPAL: The first wingsuit flight off the summit of Mount Everest is to be broadcast live by the Discovery Channel. High-altitude climber Joby Ogwyn will make the attempt in May.

The network will air a live two-hour broadcast showing the California native as he battles conditions on the way to the summit of the world’s tallest mountain, then takes the plunge.

His custom-made wingsuit will be equipped with cameras to capture the descent of more than 10,000 vertical feet at speeds exceeding 240km/h.

JAPAN: Staff at a zoo chased a keeper in a gorilla costume as part of an annual escape drill to brush up their skills in the event of a real breakout.

Visitors to Ueno Zoo in Tokyo watched as the pretend primate was coralled by dozens of staff wielding nets, before being subdued with a mock stun gun and bundled onto a nearby pick-up truck.

Zookeeper Natsumi Uno, who was inside the gorilla suit, said it had been nice to be able to switch places for the day.

“In my job, we sometimes have the chance to catch an animal, but never to get caught,” she said.

“When the other keepers chased me, I could really understand the animal’s feelings. We need to think about people’s safety, but also about the safety of the animal we are catching. That is why this drill is important.”

USA: There was nothing fishy about this attempted break-in.

Big Mouth Billy Bass apparently got the best of a would-be burglar in a Minnesota store.

Authorities in Rochester say the motion-activated singing fish apparently scared off an intruder who tried to break into the Hooked on Fishing bait and tackle shop.

The novelty bass had been hung near the door and would start singing ‘Take Me to the River’ whenever someone entered the shop.

The Olmsted County Sheriff's Office says the fish was found on the floor after the intruder knocked it down while breaking the door to get in late Sunday or early Monday.

Sgt. Tom Claymon tells the Star Tribune the would-be burglar left without stealing anything, including cash that had been left in “a very visible spot”.




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