Women join the Augusta club, for first time in 80 years

For the first time in its 80-year history, Augusta National Golf Club has female members.

The home of the US Masters, under increasing criticism over the last decade because of its all-male membership, invited former secretary of state Condoleezza Rice and South Carolina financier Darla Moore to become the first women in green jackets when the club opens for a new season in October. Both women accepted.

“This is a joyous occasion,” said Augusta National chairman Billy Payne.

The move ends a debate that intensified in 2002 when Martha Burk of the US National Council of Women’s Organisations urged the club to include women among its members.

Former club chairman Hootie Johnson stood his ground, even at the cost of losing Masters television sponsors for two years, when he famously said Augusta National might one day have a woman in a green jacket, “but not at the point of a bayonet”.

The comment took on a life of its own, becoming either a slogan of the club’s resolve not to give in to public pressure or a sign of its sexism, depending on which side of the debate was interpreting it.

Payne, who took over as chairman in 2006 when Johnson retired, said consideration for new members is deliberate and private, and that Rice and Moore were not treated differently from other new members.

Even so, he took the rare step of announcing two of the latest members to join because of the historical significance.

“These accomplished women share our passion for the game of golf and both are well known and respected by our membership,” Payne said in a statement.

“It will be a proud moment when we present Condoleezza and Darla their green jackets when the club opens this fall. This is a significant and positive time in our club’s history and, on behalf of our membership, I wanted to take this opportunity to welcome them and all of our new members into the Augusta National family.”


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