Poland rules on chemical castration

POLAND has approved a law-making chemical castration mandatory for paedophiles in some cases, sparking criticism from human rights groups.

Under the law, sponsored by Poland’s centre-right government, paedophiles convicted of raping children under the age of 15 years or a close relative would have to undergo chemical therapy on their release from prison.

“The purpose of thisaction is to improve the mental health of the convict, to lower his libido and thereby to reduce the risk of another crime being committed by the same person,” the government said in a statement.

Prime Minister Donald Tusk said late last year he wanted obligatory castration for paedophiles, whom he branded “degenerates”.

Tusk said he did notbelieve “one can use the term ‘human’ for such individuals, such creatures”.

“Therefore, I don’t think protection of human rights should refer to these kind of events,” Tusk said.

His remarks drew criticism from human rights groups, but he never retracted them.

“Introducing any mandatory treatment raises doubts as such a requirement is never reasonable and life can always produce cases that lawmakers could never have even dreamt of,” said Piotr Kladoczny from the Helsinki Foundation of Human Rights.

“If somebody is of sound mind, we punish him. If he is sick, we try to cure him – that’s how it works in Polish law. This bill introduces both approaches. As far as I know, this makes our law the strictest inEurope on this issue,” said Kladoczny.

The bill, which also increases prison sentences for rape and incest, must still be approved by the upper chamber of parliament. This is seen as a formality, as Tusk’s Civic Platform party holds a majority of its 100 seats.


Lifestyle

We may all have had a sneaky go at air-guitar playing, but what about crafting a real-life musical instrument yourself from scratch? If that hits a bum note, perhaps designing a pair of snazzy earrings or becoming your own interiors expert and redecorating your entire home is more your thing?Getting creative while staying home: Online workshops that should be a hit with all ages

Remote working has helped companies around the world to stay open during the virus crisis. It's a key building block to build the case for reduced hours in the workplace, says an entrepreneur who say we are more productive when we work four days a week.Less is more: Building case for the four-day week

Kya deLongchamps puts sails on the laundry with refreshing reasons to dry outdoors.Great drying out there: How to make drying clothes a breeze

Our battle with back pain is an uphill struggle and possibly even more so since we’ve started to work from home to help delay the spread of coronavirus.Put your back into it: Exercise to beat back pain

More From The Irish Examiner