Obama children’s book focuses on inspirational figures

US PRESIDENT BarackObama has written a book for children about inspirational Americans which is set to be released later this year.

“Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters” is a tribute to 13 groundbreaking Americans, from the first president, George Washington, to baseball great Jackie Robinson and artist Georgia O’Keeffe.

It will be released on November 16 by Alfred A Knopf Books for Young Readers, an imprint of Random House Children’s Books. The book was due to be officially announced last night.

Obama is not the first president to write for young people. Jimmy Carter’s “The Little Baby Snoogle-Fleejer” was published in 1995, more than a decade after he left office. More in line with Obama’s effort, Theodore Roosevelt collaborated with Henry Cabot Lodge on “Hero Tales from American History,” released in 1895, before Roosevelt was president.

Obama’s book is illustrated by Loren Long, whose many credits include Watty Piper’s classic “The Little Engine That Could”, Randall de Seve’s “Toy Boat” and Madonna’s “Mr Peabody’s Apples”.

His cover design for “Of Thee I Sing” is a sunny impression of presidential daughters Sasha and Malia Obama walking their dog, Bo, along a grassy field.

Obama’s 40-page book will have a first printing of 500,000 copies. Both of Obama’s previous works, the memoir “Dreams From My Father” and the policy book “The Audacity of Hope,” are million sellers published by Crown, a division of Random House.

The president will donate any author proceeds to “a scholarship fund for the children of fallen and disabled soldiers serving our nation,” the publisher said in a statement.

“Of Thee I Sing” is part of a $1.9 million, three-book deal with Random House reached in 2004, according to a disclosure report filed in 2005, when Obama was a US senator from Illinois.


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