Nearly 3,000 pig carcasses dumped in city’s waters

A surge in the dumping of dead pigs upstream from Shanghai — with more than 2,800 carcasses floating into the financial hub — has followed a police campaign to curb the illicit trade in sick pig parts.

The effort to keep infected pork off dinner tables may be fuelling new health fears, as Shanghai residents and local media fret over the possibility of contamination to the city’s water supply, though authorities say no contamination has been detected.

Authorities have been pulling out the swollen and rotting pigs, some with their internal organs visible, since Friday — and revolting images of the carcasses have raised public ire against local officials.

Shanghai officials said the number of dumped adult and piglet carcasses retrieved had reached 2,813. The city government, citing monitoring authorities, said the drinking water quality has not been affected.

Shanghai’s agriculture committee said authorities don’t know what caused the pigs to die, but that they have detected a sometimes-fatal pig disease in at least one of the carcasses. The disease is associated with the porcine circovirus, which is widespread in pigs but doesn’t affect humans or other livestock.

Shanghai’s city government said initial investigations had found the dead pigs had come from Jiaxing city in neighbouring Zhejiang province. It said it had not found any major epidemic.

Huang Beibei, a lifetime resident of Shanghai, was the first to expose the problem when he took photos of the carcasses and uploaded them onto his blog on Thursday.

The dumping follows a clampdown on the illegal trade in contaminated pork.

In China, pigs that have died from disease should be either incinerated or buried, but some farmers and animal control officials have sold problematic carcasses to slaughterhouses. The pork harvested from such carcasses has ended up in markets. As a food safety problem, it has drawn attention from China’s Ministry of Public Security, which has made it a priority to crack down on gangs that purchase dead diseased pigs and process them for illegal profits.


Lifestyle

As Foo Fighters get ready to rock Dublin, Ed Power traces Dave Grohl’s journey from the wreckage of Nirvana to fronting another of the biggest rock bands on the planet. It’s a tale that also has a surprising Irish twistDavid Grohl: Playing through the pain ahead of Dublin gig

If you can fill a brown bin you can fill a compost heap, says Fiann Ó NualláinNo need to get in a heap about seasonal composting

Whether zipping through the air at 160kph, bouncing in a speedboat at 40 knots, or exploring the dream-like Italianate village of Portmeirion, North Wales is a revelation, and just a short ferry trip away.A weekend zipping through Wales

Kya deLongchamps says the top 1960s sideboards are as good an investment as the best of GeorgianWhy 1960s sideboards are as good an investment as the best of Georgian

More From The Irish Examiner