Iran suspends stoning to death of woman

IRANIAN authorities have suspended the sentence of death by stoning for a woman convicted of adultery, the foreign ministry said yesterday, after weeks of condemnation from around the world.

“The verdict regarding the extramarital affairs has stopped and it’s being reviewed,” Foreign Ministry Ramin Mehmanparast told Iran’s state-run English-language Press TV.

The statement came a day after European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso called the sentence “barbaric beyond words”, the latest in a string of criticisms by foreign powers.

Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani was convicted of adultery – a capital crime in the Islamic Republic – in 2006. She also has been charged with involvement in her husband’s murder.

In a live telephone interview, Mehmanparast said the murder charge was “being investigated for the final verdict to be issued”.

Iranian media have suggested that the stoning sentence – imposed for certain crimes under sharia law which Iran adopted after the 1979 Islamic revolution – would not be carried out, but that Ashtiani might still be executed by hanging.

“We think that this is a very normal case,” Mehmanparast said. “This dossier looks likes many other dossiers that exist in other countries.”

At no point in the interview, which was in the Farsi language, but was dubbed over by a simultaneous translation into English, did he mention “stoning”, referring merely to Ashtiani’s “death sentence”.

Mehmanparast blamed the US for stirring the furore to hurt Iran’s international image as it faces sanctions aimed at curbing its nuclear programme.

“It looks like they are playing a political game,” he said.

According to Amnesty International, Iran is second only to China in the number of people it executes. It put to death at least 346 people in 2008.


Lifestyle

I’d always promised myself a day off school when Gay Bryne died.Secret diary of an Irish teacher: I’ve been thinking about my students, wondering who their ‘Gay Byrne’ will be

In an industry where women battle ageism and sexism, Meryl Streep has managed to decide her own destiny – and roles, writes Suzanne HarringtonJeepers Streepers: Hollywood royalty, all hail queen Meryl

'Ask Audrey' has been the newspaper's hysterical agony aunt “for ages, like”.Ask Audrey: Guten tag. Vot the f**k is the story with your cycle lanes?

Daphne Wright’s major new exhibition at the Crawford addresses such subjects as ageing and consumerism, writes Colette SheridanFinding inspiration in domestic situations

More From The Irish Examiner