Girl, 4, washes up on Turkish beach

Hundreds of migrants march down a highway towards Turkey's western border with Greece and Bulgaria, near Edirne, Turkey yesterday. The group was stopped by Turkish lawenforcement before reaching the city centre.

Another child’s body has been washed up on a beach in western Turkey. The body of a four-year-old Syrian girl’s body was discovered yesterday.

The unidentified girl was found in the town of Cesme in Izmir province. The inflatable boat she was on sank while attempting to carry 15 Syrians to the Greek island of Chios.

The remaining 14 Syrians, eight of whom where children, were rescued by the Turkish coast guard. This harrowing information arrives just weeks after images of drowned Syrian toddler Aylan Kurdi shook the world.

Aylan Kurdi’s father has spoken publicly about his family’s tragedy saying all he wants to do is “lie in a grave” with his family.

Abdullah Kurdi also lost his wife and another son when the boat they were on, bound for Greece, capsized.

UNHCR says more than 442,440 people have crossed the Mediterranean this year, and 2,921 have died trying.

The disturbing photos of Aylan caused an outpouring of emotion across the world and forced European countries to step up their response to the refugee crisis.

But two weeks later EU members are to decide on how to accommodate the tens of thousands of new arrivals.

Meanwhile, Dutch prosecutors said they had arrested two Syrians suspected of operating a large people-smuggling ring that brought hundreds of Syrian refugees into Europe.

Following a year-long investigation, Dutch authorities arrested a 35-year-old Syrian man living in the southern city of Eindhoven as well as his 26-year-old cousin.

Europol, Europe’s police agency, is tracking as many as 30,000 suspected people smugglers who are taking advantage of large flows into the continent of refugees escaping conflict in the Middle East and Africa.

The gang first approached refugees in Turkey, offering boat trips to Greece and Italy for €7,000, the statement said.

The road journey to other European countries, including Denmark, Sweden and Germany, cost up to €1,500 extra. The smugglers then provided cars and drivers for refugees passing through Greece, Austria and Hungary. Transit locations were run out of Milan, Athens, Vienna and Budapest.

The Dutch investigation was assisted by authorities in Germany, Italy, Austria and Hungary and co-ordinated by Europol.


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