France deploying anti-drone technology for Euro 2016

Anti-drone measures to be put in place for Euro 2016 championship

An unidentified drone buzzes a soccer stadium crammed with spectators at the European Championship. It might just be carrying a camera. Or something more sinister. Toxic chemicals, perhaps.

Either way, the unauthorised flying machine is violating a no-fly zone in place for Europe’s biggest sports event since deadly attacks in Paris last November.

Taking no chances, Euro 2016 organisers said that new technology will be deployed at the June 10 to July 10 tournament in 10 French cities to protect against unwanted airborne intruders.

Euro 2016 security chief Ziad Khoury said no-fly zones will be declared over all 10 stadiums as well as training grounds for the 24 teams.

“We’ve noted the general proliferation of drone-usage in society,” Khoury said in his Paris office.

“So no-fly zones will be defined over every training ground and every stadium, and in most stadiums and for most matches anti-drone measures — which are quite innovative — will be deployed, working with the state, which will interfere with drones and take control of them if they are spotted.”

French authorities have been alarmed by dozens of mystery drone overflights of sensitive sites — mostly nuclear facilities, but also military installations and even the presidential palace.

In response, the government is funding research into technology that could interfere with or jam signals that control drones, or even destroy them.

The government’s general secretariat for defence and national security confirmed that anti-drone measures will be in place for Euro 2016 but said the exact type of technologies to be deployed will be decided in coming days.

The French gendarmerie already has powerful but not particularly sophisticated portable equipment that could help steer drones away from stadiums by interfering with GPS signals; its drawback is that it could also interfere with GPS signals for civil use, including for aircraft.

Microwave technology that could bring down drones is also being looked at, as are other ground-based technologies to cut or jam signals to the flying machines.

French authorities have trained for the possibility of drones being used to disperse chemicals over spectators.

A training exercise in April in Saint-Etienne, a Euro 2016 city in southeast France, imagined that a drone carrying chemical agents had plunged into crowds at the Geoffroy Guichard Stadium, which will host three group matches in June and one game in the knockout round.

“When you prepare an event of this size, you must imagine all scenarios, even the most unlikely,” Khoury said.

He said authorities have no specific intelligence to indicate drones are a threat.

More on this topic

Euro 2020 draw: Ireland get rub o’ the greenEuro 2020 draw: Ireland get rub o’ the green

Russian arrested over Euro 2016 attack on British football fanRussian arrested over Euro 2016 attack on British football fan

Charlie Bird investigates the plight of Irish fans who just can't let Euro 2016 goCharlie Bird investigates the plight of Irish fans who just can't let Euro 2016 go

UEFA to honour Ireland fans for 'outstanding contribution' to Euro 2016UEFA to honour Ireland fans for 'outstanding contribution' to Euro 2016


Lifestyle

After separating from my husband of 15 years I was worried about how to meet someone new. In fact, on the dating apps I signed up to, I’ve had an overwhelming number of replies — but only from sexually enthusiastic younger men.Sex File: Dating a younger man is socially acceptable

Their paths first crossed in the classroom 13 years ago for childhood sweethearts Emma Murphy and Kevin Leahy.Wedding of the Week: Lessons in love started in the classroom for childhood sweethearts

“This podcast features something never previously heard — anywhere, from anyone — the confession tape of an Irish serial killer.'Podcast Corner: Chilling story of an Irish serial killer

Children’s creativity is inspiring, says Helen O’Callaghan.Inspiring creativity: Kids on call for climate essay

More From The Irish Examiner