Death toll from Philippine storm hits 140

RESCUERS pulled more bodies from swollen rivers yesterday as residents started to dig out their homes from under carpets of mud after flooding left 140 people dead in the Philippine capital and surrounding towns.

Overwhelmed officials called for international help, warning they may not have sufficientresources to withstandanother storm that forecasters said was brewing east of the island nation and could hit as early as Friday. Authorities expected the death toll from Tropical Storm Ketsana, which scythed across the northern Philippines on Saturday, to rise as rescuers reach villages blocked off by floating cars and other debris. The storm dumped more than a month’s worth of rain in just 12 hours,fuelling the worst flooding to hit the country in more than 40 years. At least 140 people died and 32 are missing. Troops, police and volunteers have already rescued over 7,900 people, but unconfirmed reports of more deaths abound, defence secretary Gilbert Teodoro said.

He said help from foreign governments will ensure the Philippine government can continue its relief work. “We are trying our level best to provide basic necessities, but the potential for a more serious situation is there,” Teodoro said. “We cannot wait for that to happen.”

The extent of devastation became clearer yesterday as TV networks broadcast images of mud-covered communities, cars upended on city streets and reported huge numbers of villagers without drinking water, food and power.

In Manila’s suburban Marikina city, a sofa hung from electric wires. The government has declared a “state of calamity” in Manila and 25 storm-hit provinces, allowing officials to use emergency funds for relief and rescue.

The homes of nearly half a million people were inundated. Some 115,000 of them were brought to about 200 schools, churches and other evacuation shelters, officials said.

Resident Jeff Aquino said floodwaters rose to his home’s third floor at the height of the storm. Aquino, his wife, three young children and two nephews spent that night on their roof without food and water, mixing infant formula for his 2-year-old twins with the falling rain.

“We thought it was the end for us,” Aquino said.

America has donated $100,000 (€68,357) and 20 US soldiers providing counter-terrorism training in the country have been helping with the relief effort. The UN is also providing aid.


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