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‘Fatal foetal abnormality’ is not a medical term

I see in this paper’s editorial ‘The issue that won’t go away— Abortion figures’ (May 18) that the phrase ‘fatal foetal abnormalities’ is used.

It should be noted that this is not a medical term but rather one used by pro-abortion advocates to make more palatable ending the lives of unborn children who have been diagnosed with a condition which may or may not limit their life expectancy.

I say “may not” because doctors can err and women who have been given dreadful news have sometimes gone on to deliver babies who are perfectly healthy or whose situation is far less severe than was anticipated.

Even when the diagnosis is correct, the child remains a human being with just as much right to life as anyone else.

And that their short lives should be used as part of a campaign to allow for the destruction on demand of perfectly healthy unborn children is a sad reflection on the age in which we live.

Revd Patrick G Burke
 
Castlecomer

Co Kilkenny

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