Good Food Ireland - A recipe for success

The pioneering spirit of people like Myrtle Allen has inspired a generation of food producers and retailers with a taste for excellence

It was not so long ago that the notion of Irish cuisine was regarded as a bit of a joke and prompted visions of hairy bacon and watery cabbage.

No longer. The pioneering spirit of people like Myrtle Allen of Ballymaloe has inspired a generation of food producers and retailers with a taste for excellence and a commitment to local produce. That was evident last night at the national Good Food Ireland awards where Mount Juliet in Kilkenny swept the boards.

Founded in 2006, Good Food Ireland has forged an important link between the agri-food and tourism sectors by highlighting food excellence nationwide and by recognising that a good meal is as important to the tourist as accommodation and sightseeing.

Good Food Ireland now has some 600 approved providers, among them Ireland’s top restaurants and cafes, accommodation, food shops, pubs and bars, cookery schools and local food producers.

They clearly have the right recipe for success.

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