Ed Sheeran and Snow Patrol's Johnny McDaid team up as wedding singers in Derry

Ed Sheeran with wedding guests Sarah O'Kane, Rose Edwards and Mona Elliot.

Guests at a wedding in County Derry were treated to ‘The A-Team’ of headline acts when Ed Sheeran joined Snow Patrol to perform live for the bride and groom’s first dance.

Stunning bride Brid McDaid and Edinburgh native Sandy Statham were married in a beautiful, sun-kissed ceremony in the grounds of the Beech Hill Hotel on Sunday.

Brid’s brother is musician and singer-songwriter Johnny McDaid who famously collaborated with Ed Sheeran on his smash hit song ‘Photograph’.

Both singer-songwriters joined other members of Snow Patrol on stage at the wedding reception for Brid and Sandy to perform a set including ‘Chasing Cars’, ‘Tenerife Sea’, and a lively cover of Stevie Wonder’s Motown classic ‘Superstition’.

Beech Hill Country House Hotel manager Conor Donnelly said: “We enjoyed a wonderful day to celebrate the beautiful garden wedding of the happy couple.

“The sun was out in force and so were the stars who wowed the guests with their talent and crowned off what was a fantastic wedding celebration here at the Beech Hill Country House Hotel.

“The wedding guests were treated to very special performance which was fitting for such a great occasion.”

The wedding ceremony of Brid and Sandy took place on the gazebo in the garden grounds of the Ardmore hotel with music provided by Paul Casey and Helen West.

Among the celebrity guests attending the ceremony were Courtney Cox and her daughter Coco Arquette.


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