Tangled Web can begin to make up for lost time at Naas

Tangled Web gets the nap to take the two-mile handicap hurdle on a competitive card at Naas this afternoon.

The Christy Roche-trained eight-year-old looked smart in younger days, particularly when winning a maiden hurdle at Ballinrobe in 2013.

Thereafter he was off the track for two and a half years until returning at Punchestown last month, when he ran a super race to finish third behind the progressive, hat-trick-completing Oscar Sam.

He travelled strongly for most of the trip, but was unable to pick up at the death. What also caught the eye was the exhibition of jumping he gave.

Although the bounce factor has got to be a concern, it’s quite clear he’s capable of winning off a mark of 109, and it’s also encouraging that Barry Geraghty has chosen him over Joshua Lane.

The drop back to two miles looks a positive move, and the lightly raced gelding can begin to make up for lost time by taking this at the expense of Lake Field.

Lagostovegas can take the opener for Harry Kelly.

The filly, on the mark on the flat during the summer, has run well on all three starts over hurdles, finishing runner-up to Rashaan and Footpad respectively on her first couple of starts, and finishing a fine third behind leading juvenile Ivanovich Gorbatov last time.

This looks a more manageable assignment and this imposing filly can shed her maiden status over hurdles at the fourth time of asking.

Billy’s Hope can build on the promise of her hurdling debut by taking the opening race on tomorrow’s card at Leopardstown.

Jessica Harrington’s mare gained plenty of experience in bumpers, winning one and finishing place in three of her four other starts in that sphere. 

She made her debut over hurdles at Leopardstown, and was far from disgraced when third behind easy winner Coney Island.

A repeat of that level of performance would likely be good enough here but there should be improvement to come, and she can score at the expense of Pride Of The Braid.

Pylonthepressure should take a world of beating in the two-and-a-half-mile maiden hurdle.

Beaten just once in four outings in bumpers, he was sent off an odds-on favourite to make a winning start over hurdles at Fairyhouse, in November, but found Tombstone too good.

While he was put in his place in the closing stages, the winner did plenty for the form when finishing a close and somewhat unlucky second behind Long Dog in a Grade 1 Hurdle at Leopardstown on his next start.

Point to Point winner Pylonthepressure should be better for that experience, and is taken to account for impressive bumper winner Our Duke and the experienced-but-frustrating Delegate.

Interesting and possibly significant Barry Geraghty chose to ride After Rain in the Coral Hurdle, but another JP McManus-owned runner, De Name Escapes Me, is just preferred.

Trained by Noel Meade, he has won his last couple of outings over hurdles, and appeals as the type to continue to progress.

Impressive over two and a half miles last time, the drop back in trip is of no concern as a fast run race, which is likely, should bring out the best in him.

In a very competitive race, he looks value at around the 14-1 mark.


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