Don’t Miss Me Now

Quite a tricky looking card at Wexford today, where the ground is expected to ride on the easy side of good. Although Miss Me Now would prefer a little more cut in the ground, the Willie Mullins-trained mare will be very hard to beat in the closing bumper.

The five-year-old made her debut at Sligo recently, and was given a very positive ride by Patrick Mullins.

She travelled well on the front end, and used her obvious stamina to pull a long way clear in the closing stages.

Runner-up in that race was the well-backed Ma Garrett, who didn’t do the form any harm when finishing with a real rattle to take second place behind English raider High Secret in a 15-furlong flat race last weekend at Killarney.

While today’s race is a quarter of a mile shorter than the Sligo race, Mullins will almost certainly give his mount another forward ride, to bring her staying ability into play once more.

With improvement most likely, she can fend off the likely challenges of Galway winner Kalopsia and Thurles scorer Elusive Ivy.

There’s a terrific card tomorrow afternoon at the Curragh, where Rockaway Valley gets the nap to land the Group 3 Round Tower Stakes for Jessica Harrington.

The youngster was most impressive when beating subsequent maiden winners Juliette Fair, Air Vice Marshall, Only Mine and Restive at this track, in early June, but found Painted Cliffs too good upped to Group 2 company next time.

Though runner-up, that may not have been a fair reflection of his ability, and he was given a short break afterwards.

He returned to contest the Group 1 Phoenix Stakes earlier this month, and ran better than his finishing position suggests, when fifth of seven behind Air Force Blue.

He can be expected to come on for that run and can make the most of this significant drop in class, en route to better things.

As Al Qahwa would prefer quicker conditions, Smash Williams, who ran away with a maiden last weekend at this track, may prove the greatest danger.

The Flame Of Tara listed race looks a real cracker, and the exciting How High The Moon can follow up her debut success.

In a hot maiden here three weeks ago, she was hampered by a loose horse mid-race but switched wide and picked up really well to win going away, from the highly-regarded Midnight Crossing.

The step up to a mile looks an obvious plus for the half-sister to Diamondsandrubies, and she can land the spoils at the expense of Clear Skies, and form choice Miss Katie Mae.

The Tote Irish Cambridgeshire also features on the card, and Algonquin can continue his winning run by taking what is a typically ultra-competitive renewal.

The Jim Bolger-trained colt is unbeaten in four runs since finishing down the field on debut, and there’s no reason to believe he’s reached the limit of his ability.

A 5lb rise for defeating Devonshire at Killarney recently looks fair, and he is preferred to Portage, who also has plenty of potential for improvement.

At Cork, Roconga has a clear opportunity shed his maiden status over hurdle in the opening race.

Eddie O’Grady’s gelding found only the potentially smart Portmore Lough too good at Kilbeggan last time, and a similar effort would make him very hard to beat.

End Of Line is the most interesting of his rivals.

Once rated 98 on the level, in Britain, he could be smart in this sphere if staying. Money for him would be significant.

Tigris River can follow up his Galway victory, by taking the two-mile hurdle for Aidan O’Brien, while Daneking has obvious claims in the JP McManus Rated Hurdle.


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