PaperTalk GAA Show: A step on Limerick's journey, Kerry 'chastened' and Dubs put paid to The Savage Hunger

Anthony Daly and Mike Quirke review the GAA weekend.

Jubilant scenes in Salthill - Anthony Daly assesses how important promotion from Division 1B is on Limerick's journey. Is there a limit in sight to the unlimited heartbreak?

But could there be repercussions for several players involved in controversial incidents during the win over Galway?

Plus: Mike Quirke on Kerry woe and Dublin's riches. Jim Gavin's side have put an end to the idea that 'hunger' wins All-Irelands.

But is, as Jim claims, Gaelic football being sanitised?

And does the game need citing officials watching videos every Monday?

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