GAA plans conciliation process to combat racism

President Liam O’Neill has revealed plans are afoot to curb the growing number of racial incidences within the GAA.

O’Neill vowed that the association will bring forward a motion at next year’s congress — whereby a conciliation process takes place between the perpetrator and victim — which he hopes will educate players who target others because of their race, colour or sexual preference.

“There are technicalities to it and it’s very difficult about how you do it, but we are going with the line of when an incident happens, that there is a conciliation process first before there is a punishment, that the person who performs the act and the person at whom it is directed need to have a chat about it,” O’Neill said.

“It’s not as simple as giving a red card for a punishment. A process needs to be there and there will be an education process that if an individual abuses somebody, that he will have to go through some form of a personal relations course and how to deal with other people before he would be allowed back to playing the game.

“I think we are moving towards living in a multi-cultural society and we have to respect that. We have to use that to reeducate ourselves on our behaviours on the field. We will be bringing the rule to congress and I would be hopeful that it will get through.”


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