Davy Glennon’s gambling a time of ‘hardship and misery’

Galway hurler Davy Glennon has described the years battling a gambling addiction as a time of “hardship and misery”

Glennon received 240 hours’ community service, in lieu of seven concurrent two-year sentences, after he pleaded guilty to the theft of an estimated €70,000 from his employers to fund his addiction.

Speaking on RTE Radio One yesterday, Glennon hopes to start a new chapter in his life, helping others. “It’s nice to have a free mind and a free spirit,” Glennon told Today with Sean O’Rourke.

“You can go out and put yourself forward in the best possible position and shape who you can be. It’s nice to have that burden off your back too after going through years of hardship and misery. It was an ongoing problem for years, it was probably going to come to a day when something was going to be found out. The stick was going to have to break or I was going to have to say I need to do something badly. There were so many stories from gambling cars and money, to stealing money at home, money that was lying around.

“It was beg, borrow, and steal. My family knew I was gambling, my parents were going to counselling because of my addiction.”

He continued: “I was working with J&C Kenny. I had a massive debt because of my addiction. I left my position and I had to get three months of treatment. When I came out of treatment there was a massive bill there and it had to be sorted. My parents always said they never owed anyone any money and I was going to be the same.

“It was very embarrassing and I was ashamed of what I’d done and I had affected a lot of people. I was a compulsive liar and a thief and I was basically doing everything I could to con people and get the cash to gamble.”

The full interview can be heard at https://www.rte.ie/radio1/today-with-sean-o-rourke">here.



Lifestyle

Unmasking Limerick's newest masked rapper

How to stop tensions boiling over this festive season

Decorating your house for Christmas? Here's some advice from three Irish interior designers

A look back at the 10 big stories form the year in music

More From The Irish Examiner