Cork manager Paudie Murray 'absolutely frustrated with the standard of refereeing'

Camogie officials confirm match ref played correct amount of injury time as Kilkenny edge Cork in All-Ireland semi-final
Cork manager Paudie Murray 'absolutely frustrated with the standard of refereeing'

FURIOUS: Cork manager Paudie Murray during Saturday's All-Ireland semi-final defeat to Kilkenny: "I don't want to get started again and again on referees. I am just sick to death of it."

The referee for the Cork-Kilkenny All-Ireland camogie semi-final, Owen Elliot, is satisfied the correct amount of second-half injury time was played after the RTÉ television clock suggested he blew for full-time two minutes early.

Elliot signalled for four minutes of second-half injury-time, with the stadium clock at Páirc Uí Chaoimh showing over 64 minutes elapsed when the referee blew for full-time.

The Páirc Uí Chaoimh stadium clock did not pause time during the second-half water break, whereas the RTÉ television clock did, thus creating the discrepancy in time.

A Camogie Association spokesperson spoke with Elliot after the game and the referee said he was satisfied the correct amount of injury time had been played, as was a referee’s assessor studying Elliot’s officiating.

Timekeeping aside, Cork manager Paudie Murray was not impressed with the performance of the referee.

“A lot of things went on out there that I certainly wasn't happy with. I thought the referee was very inconsistent. I think we were blown for over carrying on a number of occasions, you'd like that to apply on the other side as well,” Murray remarked.

"I don't want to get started again and again on referees. I am just sick to death of it. Certain things went on out there, the fourth official was told on it, as was the linesman. I seriously question [the referee's] display today.

Murray did accept Cork’s wastefulness contributed to their own downfall. The Rebels limited their opponents to one second-half score from play and kept Kilkenny scoreless for a 21-minute period, but were unable to capitalise on a succession of chances at the other end.

“We had our chances to win it. At this level small margins are everything and one or two scores would have tipped it.” 

The manager disagreed with the suggestion that Cork, whose game-plan centres around a short-passing game, should have been more direct in their play.

“I am sick of hearing that. There were an awful lot of people on during the week shouting about it. When we play our short, running game, the first 15 minutes is an example of that, when we did it, we carved them open. Our biggest problem was that we went away from that. Maybe the players listened to the press too much.” 

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