House of the Week

YEARS of professional architectural expertise went into making No 2, Woodview a simple viewing pleasure. It’s a Leeside home that works.

Set just where the River Lee divides into its north and south channels by the end of the Lee Fields and Wellington Bridge, this recreated, and re-imagined home, is a city one-off, with a weir as a feature backdrop, and the water under its nose.

And, before any alarm bells start ringing, or wringing, it’s a place that didn’t get a drop of water damage or ingress two years ago when a devastating dam discharge at Inniscarra wreaked havoc downriver and on into the city centre. That’s wholly reassuring.

No 2 was the professional design offices of (now retired) architect Dominic O’Flynn, in the 1980s and 1990s, and towards the latter half of the 90s he re-did it from top to toe, front to back, as his own family’s private city pad.

Now, he’s moving on, and since he did all the work, No 2 Woodview might more appropriately be called Weirview.

He removed the old back of the semi-detached older era home, and enlarged and reconfigured it so that it got maximum benefit of the back’s river Lee and southerly aspect, now captured by bay windows from the master bedroom above, and the long, 26’ deep and 16’ wide living/dining room, which culminates in a safe, sun-trap terrace with colourful planting and privacy.

You could sort of say all the best spaces are here to the back, but that’s sort of implying the front rooms, out to the bridge-bend onto the Lee Road aren’t of quality, and they are.

New to market with Sheila O’Flynn of Sherry FitzGerald, No 2’s a semi with sophistication, a townhouse with a twist, a penthouse with a purpose — it’s all of these niche appeals, and more.

Immaculately maintained and polished, and bright with several Veluxes drawing in light to the centre core at critical points, it’s a walk-in job, within easy walk of the city centre, with the Lee Fields and Mardyke amenity walks across the river, as are sports facilities, Fitzgerald’s Park, UCC and the Bon Secours. With a location like that, it’s going to come within the radar of medics and academics, but with a price guide of €270,000 can be easily bought by those on sub-consultant and sub-professorial salaries.

It’s most likely to appeal to singles, couples or retirees, as even though there’s enough space for a small family, most parents will be mindful of the river’s proximity and the dangerous allure of riverbanks and fishing for smallies. but, for anyone else, it’s a home on the riverbank, high, dry and with salmon pooling on the back doorstep (poachers do love a Sunday’s Well salmon).

To the front, is a kitchen/breakfast space, with utility, and bespoke solid timber units in beech done by a West Cork joiner, there’s a guest WC, and that attractive large living/dining, with recessed lighting, ceiling coving, and Bath sandstone fireplace.

The staircase is in the house’s middle, with overhead skylights, and it splits to serve the rear master bedroom, and the house’s two front bedrooms, one’s a single or optional home office (every room has Pabx phone lines). The other bedroom, with two windows to the front, has an en suite shower which can be opened as a Jack and Jill suite option and shared with the smaller bed three if needs be.

The master bedroom, again with the same great river and weir views as its downstairs counterpart, is reached via a walk-through closet, with oodles of storage, and has an en suite with twin sinks, bath, and separate WC with shower, all very calm, collected and cool, with marble on the tops, as splashbacks, and as floor tiles.

VERDICT: Pure Cork setting.


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