Dunedin a done deal




This period-era home just needs a lick of paint because it ticks all the basics, writes Tommy Barker

ALL the basics are ticked at this Cork City period-era home, called Dunedin — and it’s got charm and airiness on top of all of that. The three-storey, semi-detached, four-bed home has been extended and updated with a new-ish kitchen and a re-done main bathroom; as a real bonus, it has off-street parking for a couple of cars, and, further, there’s a lofted self-contained garage which has been upgraded almost to apartment level, so it can be used for storage, gym, or granny flat.

This box-ticking Dunedin package is an easy walk to Cork’s city centre, either via the South Infirmary pivot at the Old Blackrock Road, Victoria Road and the quays; or down by Rockboro Avenue towards the Elysian.

The c2,500sq ft Victorian home is guided at €425,000 by estate agent Brian Olden of Cohalan Downing, who says it’s both elegant and impressive, and with an appeal to urban families as well as to couples.

Dunedin’s the sort of place that even a fresh coat of paint inside and out, or maybe some other interior design touches for personal style and input, will bring to a whole other level of look and luxury.

It’s got lots of retained Victorian touches, such as the original hall tiles, several of the fireplaces put in day one, as well as a stained glass in the front door, bay windows and high, coved ceilings.

And, the way its ground floor has been opened up to the back makes for a great flow of rooms. There’s now about 50’ of interlinked depth, through from the front sitting room’s bay window, next via the mid-ships’ study, and then that added-on rear living room completes the picture. That back room alone is 27’ by 13’, a great space (although with north and east aspects) and opens to the kitchen, which has a utility and guest WC in a back hall with rear patio access.

Up the original staircase, there are two bedrooms at first-floor level, one overlooking the back garden and patio, the other’s to the front, with a sun-catching bay window plus a second window to the south. This master bedroom’s the full width of the house at almost 16’ across, with a wall of built-ins, but minus any en suite.

To the back, off the stair return, is an excellent family bathroom, with contemporary walk-in shower enclosure, a separate bath, wall-hung pan, and it’s all fairly extensively tiled, just needing a splash of colour to set a tone or mood. Overhead, at attic level, are two further bedrooms, both doubles, thanks to the space donated by the annex section.

For inner suburban-living aficionados, Dunedin has a strong location, a 10-minute walk to the city centre, or a cycle to everywhere else, and while it faces the Old Blackrock Road, it’s got enough of a screening, easy-keep front garden. Then, once through the side gate by the off-road parking spot, there’s privacy out to the rear. Here’s there’s a patio, decent lawn area, secure old boundaries, garden shed, and that multi-use self-contained garage/apartment. Out to the back, it’s also got more distant views towards Montenotte.

LOCATION: Old Blackrock Road, Cork

PRICE: €425,000

SIZE: 230 sq m (2,300 sq ft)

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 3

BER RATING: Pending

BEST FEATURE: Period home updated

VERDICT: Already very good, Dunedin will respond to design flair and furnishing.


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