Plans lodged for more than 30 homes in Cork suburb

Plans for a development of more than 30 new homes in the southside suburbs of Cork have been lodged.

The application is for 15 detached and 16 semi-detached houses at Cleve Hill on Blackrock Road and was submitted to Cork City Council last week.

The proposal from Targeted Investment Opportunities PLC, associated with Oaktree Capital, and Bridgedale Homes of Kildare, also proposes landscaping, access and internal roads to facilitate the project.

A council decision on the application should issue by around mid-October.

The ex-Howard Holdings’ site, which had planning for 18 homes, extends to six acres and was sold recently for c €3 million.

A local authority decision to turn down planning permission for a scheme of more than 30 new homes in north inner city Dublin has been upheld.

The plans were lodged last December and refused by Dublin City Council in February, but applicant firm Brian M. Durkan and Co. Ltd appealed the decision to An Bord Pleanála.

It had been proposed to build 34 apartments in three blocks, fronting onto Mountjoy Street, Paradise Place and St Mary’s Place North, on a site near the Black Church or St. Mary’s of Chapel-of-Ease in the north inner city.

The planning inspector’s report cited undermining of the landmark protected structure of the former church, deviation from planning policy regarding consistency of new developments with existing building heights in the area, and inadequate parking provision.

On foot of the inspector’s recommendation, the appeals board decide to turn down the application.

An Bord Pleanála has been asked to consider the recent decision of Cork County Council to approve the completion of a small scheme of houses in Douglas for which permission was first sought a decade ago.

In April of this year, Century Point Estates Ltd sought approval for the 16 houses and associated works at Bramble Hill, Castletreasure.

The 10 townhouses and six semi-detacheds were part of a larger scheme, already subject of an extension-of-duration application five years ago.

In 2010, CK Developments had been granted permission by the council for completion of a 28-house scheme for which permission was originally granted in April 2005 to T. O’Connor.

The latest application, for the 16 houses to be completed, was granted permission in July but the applicant firm has appealed conditions and two third-party appeals have been lodged, meaning a final decision is now due by mid-December.

The Westbury Hotel off Grafton Street has appealed the decision to give permission for a small mixed-use development in nearby Chatham Street in Dublin.

Fincon Developments Ltd applied to the city council in February to demolish three-storey Chatham House and build a five-storey over basement mixed-use building with 14 apartments on the upper four floors.

The ground floor was proposed to accommodate two retail units and a restaurant, the entire new development to have a total floor area of almost 2,700 square metres.

After considering additional information received in July, the council granted permission for the works in late July.

However, the conditions relating to noise, traffic and other aspects of the demolition and construction phases were deemed inadequate to allay concerns by the hotel’s management about potential impact on its business.

The issues raised in the appeal will be considered by An Bord Pleanála, which will be expected to decide the matter by the first week of next January.

A previously-permitted development of 19 new homes near Mallow in north Cork is the subject of a recent application to extend duration of the permission.

In 2009, permission was originally sought for the nine detached and 10 semi-detached homes at Ballymacmoy in the village of Killavullen. John O’Flynn is seeking to extend that previous approval in the application received by Cork County Council last month.

Permission is being requested to build 11 houses at a site outside Midleton in east Cork.

In 11 individual applications, Liam Clifford has applied to build a two-storey new home on each of the sites at Sandy Walk in Broomfield East.

A city centre premises in Cork that has previously and variously functioned as a pub, a steak house, a sweet shop and a milkshake bar is to become a recreational and leisure facility.

The unit at Skiddy’s Lane off North Main Street is on the ground floor of an apartment building and previously operated as Le Chéile bar, and more recently split between a sweet shop and an ice-cream and milkshake bar, according to the application for April McEntaggert.

The proposal submitted a year ago this week was to change use from a commercial bar to multi recreational and leisure uses, to include a multi-use space capable of being partitioned for classes such as karate, dance or yoga.

The plan is also to provide a coffee bar, retail unit and staff showering and storage areas.

Cork City Council decided to grant permission subject to 19 conditions earlier this week.


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