170-bed Dublin city hotel plan rejected

An Bord Pleanála has rejected an application to build a new 170-bedroom hotel in Dublin city centre.

In February, Dublin City Council had already refused permission to knock the Ormond Quay Hotel and to change two neighbouring properties to hotel use. But applicants Monteco Holdings referred the decision to the appeals board.

The plan was for construction of a new six-storey hotel but the planning inspector recommended refusal on grounds relating to the historic and heritage value of the addresses at 7 to 11 Ormond Quay which were proposed for demolition. She said that would result in a significant loss of historic streetscape, and loss of any potential restoration of the hotel frontage character.

The site’s heritage dates to the foundations of Dublin’s first quay in the late 17th century, and the James Joyce room dating to the 1930s (the hotel is associated with his novel Ulysses) would have been lost.

The Arts Council and Fáilte Ireland had made submissions to An Bord Pleanála in relation to the case.

* An oral hearing will take place in September in relation to the recently-approved plans for the replacement of Páirc Uí Chaoimh with a new GAA stadium in Cork.

The plans by the Cork County GAA Board to redevelop the grounds and provide a new all-weather pitch and other works at the site near Monahan Road in Ballintemple were passed by Cork City Council in April.

Following receipt of a number of third-party appeals, An Bord Pleanála will hear submissions at a public hearing of the case.

The file had been due for decision in late September but the file will now be the subject of a hearing at the city’s Imperial Hotel on September 10, based on which a planning inspector will recommend whether planning should be granted or not.

* An application for over 100 new houses in north county Dublin has been cleared after an appeal against local authority approval was withdrawn.

In July 2013, Sherman Oaks applied to Fingal County Council for the development of 102 homes, with access from Station Road in Portmarnock. The grant of permission in March was for all but one of those homes, but 51 parking spaces for which the application originally also sought approval were withdrawn in further information provided to local planners last February.

The council stipulated that, as those spaces were intended to be associated with a future local centre, any parking provision for such a centre should be included in the relevant planning application.

The permission was originally subject of a third-party appeal last April but An Bord Pleanála has this month been notified that this appeal was being withdrawn.

* Cork City Council this week granted permission for the extension of an office building on Penrose Quay which should allow for jobs growth for an international recruitment firm.

The decision on Tuesday was subject to 12 conditions and followed the provision by applicants Kevin O’Leary (Cork) Ltd of a response in early July to council concerns about parking on the site. The 372 sq m single-storey extension will be to the 621 sq m facility in use by Oxford International, which recently announced plans to almost double employee numbers to 130.

* An industrial facility in East Cork has been approved for expansion after a recent planning decision.

In May, Stryker Ireland Ltd sought permission for a 510 square metre single story extension to a production building at its plant in Carrigtwohill. Cork County Council has approved the plan, which includes provision of 11 extra parking spaces at the instruments production site in the town’s IDA industrial estate.

* A small housing scheme near Blarney is subject of a recent application to Cork County Council.

D & J Builders (Cork) Ltd has applied for permission to develop 20 semi-detached, six terraced homes, and a detached house with an attached crèche. The plan relates to a site at Rathpeacon, Killeens, and a decision is likely in late September at the earliest.


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