A hideaway sweet spot means game on in Ballintemple

Silence is goal-den says Tommy Barker

Ballintemple, Cork €360,000

110 sq m (1,200 sq ft)

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 1

BER: Pending

IT’S now entirely possible that sports fans from Clare, Waterford, Tipperary, and Wexford are as familiar with Cork’s Clifton Estate as the actual citizens of Cork city and, indeed, suburban Ballintemple are: it’s simply a hideaway sweet spot.

As up to 70,000 GAA sports fans converged on Cork last week for the weekend of matches at the new €80m Páirc Uí Chaoimh stadium, suburbs such as Ballintemple, Blackrock, and Beaumont thrummed with good-humoured visitors, and sport clubs such as St Michael’s and Cork Con opened up their grounds for paid parking.

Each and every route to and from the stadium was traversed. Clifton Estate, a niche cul de sac of a dozen or so homes, might even have been rumbled by some outsiders. That’s how private it is.

Right now, estate agent Joe Gavin of James G Coughlan Associates has No 9 Clifton Estate up for sale, and he’s nearly tearing his hair out as Cork home-hunters just don’t have the spot on their radars like he feels they should.

So, for the uninitiated, it’s set off the little-traversed Beaumont Avenue, which is entered off the main Blackrock Road, directly opposite Barrington’s Avenue, which leads walkers to the Marina, Atlantic Pond, and the new GAA stadium.

Beaumont Avenue itself peters out into a pedestrian path at its southern end, so is rarely visited, and is blissfully quiet as a result.

No 9 Clifton Park is a south-facing, three-bed semi-d on a slightly sloping site, and while it is a bit on the dated side, it has an attached garage and converted attic with stair access for storage and other uses. Guide price is €360,000, and it even has rear garden access to a pedestrian lane leading to Ballintemple village.

VERDICT: Game on.



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