Dr Gabriel Scally says he has not been paid yet for CervicalCheck inquiry work

Dr Scally said it was an honour and a privilege to work on CervicalCheck, and said he 'would have done it for nothing'
Dr Gabriel Scally says he has not been paid yet for CervicalCheck inquiry work

Responding to reports that the work of the inquiry had been paid €1.3million, Dr Scally said that the fees paid to date have gone towards paying for 'a significant number of people.' File Picture: Sam Boal / RollingNews.ie

Dr Gabriel Scally has revealed that he has not yet been paid any fees for his work on the CervicalCheck inquiry.

Responding to reports that the work of the inquiry had been paid €1.3million, Dr Scally told RTÉ radio’s Today with Claire Byrne show that the fees paid to date have gone towards paying for "a significant number of people" – namely, medical and legal experts and investigatory trips to laboratories in the US.

He said there were still some outstanding payments, but he was hopeful that they would all be paid this year. 

"If anything is left then I might get something," he said. 

I’m not motivated by money. I don’t know how much will be left.

Dr Scally said it was an honour and a privilege to work on CervicalCheck, and said he "would have done it for nothing".

If there was any money left, Dr Scally said he would use it to support other projects in which he was involved, such as enquiries in the North about the rights of patients. 

"That’s what the money goes for."

Dr Scally explained that to carry out the work of the inquiry he had set up a company which then invoiced the Department of Health as work was carried out. 

He said he had received every support from the Department of Health and that former Minister for Health Simon Harris had been "particularly helpful." 

"Simon Harris wanted me to be fully independent and in order to do that I had to set up a company," he said.  

However, he said there remained the issue of the databases used to store all the documents related to the inquiry.

Dr Scally said that while the information provided by Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly in response to a parliamentary question about the cost of the inquiry had been factually correct, it couldn’t be further from the truth that he was "a millionaire".

"I wasn’t consulted before the stories were written, I would have gladly answered any questions," he added

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