Nphet reports 50 more deaths and 3,498 new cases as Covid casualties top 2m worldwide

The global death toll from Covid-19 has passed two million, according to a count from Johns Hopkins University.
Nphet reports 50 more deaths and 3,498 new cases as Covid casualties top 2m worldwide

Earlier this week figures revealed that Ireland has the world’s highest incidence of new Covid-19 cases per million people.

A further 50 deaths of Covid-19 patients have been reported by the National Public Health Emergency Team (Nphet). This brings to 2,536 the total number of deaths in the pandemic.

Nphet also reported 3,498 confirmed cases of the disease, bringing to 166,548 the total number of cases in the Republic.

All 50 of today's reported deaths occurred in January. The age range is between 45 and 96 years and the median age was 82 years.

No further deaths have been recorded among healthcare workers and no newly reported deaths in people under 30.

Two million people have now died worldwide with coronavirus, figures show.

The tally by the Johns Hopkins University passed the threshold on Friday, showing a new figure of 2,000,905.

This afternoon, 1,850 Covid-19 patients were hospitalised, of which 184 were in ICU. An additional 118 hospitalisations occurred in the previous 24 hours.

The 14-day incidence of the disease now stands at 1533.6 cases per 100,000 people nationally. Monaghan has the highest county incidence, followed by Louth.

Of the new cases, 1,182 are in Dublin, 421 in Cork, 258 in Limerick, 187 in Galway and 164 in Waterford with the remaining 1,286 cases spread across all other counties.

Of the cases notified today, 1,576 are men and 1,906 are women. 54% are under 45 years of age, and the median age is 42 years old.

This afternoon, 1,850 Covid-19 patients were hospitalised, of which 184 were in ICU. An additional 118 hospitalisations occurred in the previous 24 hours.

This afternoon, 1,850 Covid-19 patients were hospitalised, of which 184 were in ICU. An additional 118 hospitalisations occurred in the previous 24 hours.

The chief medical officer has said that there is no new evidence that new variants of Covid-19, recently identified in Brazil and travellers to Japan from the South American country, have made it to Ireland.

Dr Tony Holohan said: "Anyone who has travelled from Brazil in the last 14 days is advised to self-isolate for 14 days, from the date of arrival, and identify themselves, through a GP, for testing as soon as possible.” 

He added: "Further risk assessment of the new variants is expected from the ECDC in the coming week."

The deputy chief medical officer, Dr Ronan Glynn, said the number of close contacts per confirmed case has dropped and case numbers are falling because of it.

Dr Glynn said: "At the end of December, the number of close contacts per confirmed case peaked at approximately 6.

"That has now dropped to 2.3 contacts. This enormous effort is the reason we are seeing case numbers beginning to fall.”

 

Chief Medical Officers in Northern Ireland and Ireland have voiced their concerns about the high levels of Covid-19 and are urging everyone to stay home.

Chief Medical Officers in Northern Ireland and Ireland have voiced their concerns about the high levels of Covid-19 and are urging everyone to stay home.

In Northern Ireland, a further 26 Covid-19 related deaths have been recorded while another 1,052 people tested positive for the coronavirus.

There are 840 patients being treated for Covid in hospital and 63 people are in ICU.

Chief Medical Officers in Northern Ireland and the Republic have voiced their concerns about the high levels of Covid-19 and are urging everyone to stay home.

In the UK, a further 1,280 people have died within 4 weeks of testing positive for coronavirus.

There were also 55,761 new cases of Covid-19 have been registered - up by around 7,000 on the day before.

Restrictions to remain in place

The Taoiseach has said the scale and pace of the increase in Covid-19 cases is “well beyond” what was predicted.

Micheál Martin said that tough restrictions to curb the spread of the virus will remain in place for some time. Picture: Gareth Chaney/Collins

Micheál Martin said that tough restrictions to curb the spread of the virus will remain in place for some time. Picture: Gareth Chaney/Collins

Micheál Martin said that tough restrictions to curb the spread of the virus will remain in place for some time.

Earlier this week figures revealed that Ireland has the world’s highest incidence of new Covid-19 cases per million people.

In an online speech hosted by the Institute of International and European Affairs (IIEA), Mr Martin said that hospitals are facing their “most terrible” weeks of the pandemic.

Vaccine production slowdown 

Pfizer confirmed it will temporarily reduce deliveries to Europe of its Covid-19 vaccine while it upgrades production capacity to two billion doses per year.

“This temporary reduction will affect all European countries,” a spokeswoman for Pfizer Denmark said in a statement. Picture: Dan Linehan

“This temporary reduction will affect all European countries,” a spokeswoman for Pfizer Denmark said in a statement. Picture: Dan Linehan

“This temporary reduction will affect all European countries,” a spokeswoman for Pfizer Denmark said in a statement.

Line Fedders said that to meet the new two billion dose target, Pfizer is upscaling production at its plant in Puurs, Belgium, which “presupposes adaptation of facilities and processes at the factory which requires new quality tests and approvals from the authorities”.

“As a consequence, fewer doses will be available for European countries at the end of January and the beginning of February,” she said.

More in this section

War of Independence Podcast

A special four-part series hosted by Mick Clifford

Available on
www.irishexaminer.com/podcasts

Commemorating 100 years since the War of Independence