Exciting London art-selling season approaches fast

Des O’Sullivan previews Surrealist, Impressionist and Contemporary art due under the hammer this spring.

An exciting London art-selling season that will see works by Monet, Picasso, Rodin, Kandinsky, Morisot, Magritte, Rothko, Rauschenberg and Richter coming under the hammer, is fast approaching.

It kicks off at Christie’s Impressionist and Modern Art evening sale on February 28 with important works by Le Corbusier.

The equivalent sale at Sotheby’s takes place on the following evening.

Both auction houses will follow with auctions of Surrealist art, day sales and sales of Contemporary art.

Claude Monet (1840-1926) — ‘Les Bords de la Seine au Petit-Gennevilliers’ at Christie’s in London on February 28 (€2.2 to €3.5m). © Christie’s Images Limited 2017.

At Sotheby’s there is a bronze Penseur by Auguste Rodin from the Attenborough collection, sculptures by Alexander Archipenko and Naum Gabo, and a colourful figurative composition by Fernand Leger.

Among the Surrealist works are Paul Delvaux’s enigmatic dreamscape Jeunes Filles au Bord de l’Eau; a 1940 gouache by Rene Magritte, and also, works by Joan Miro, Francis Picabia, Oscar Domingues and a rare unique object by Marcel Duchamp.

Penseur, petit modale by Auguste Rodin from the collection of the Attenboroughs at Sotheby’s in London on March 1. This reduced size bronze of a work conceived in 1902, was cast between 1920 and 1930 (€850,000 to€1.2m).

At Christie’s the personal collection of philanthropist Barbara Lambrecht includes two important oils by Berth Morisot and also, Claude Monet’s Les Bords de la Seine au Petit-Gennevilliers; Les deux Anges by Kees van Dongen and Picasso’s Lluis Alemany. 

All proceeds from the Lambrecht collection will benefit the Rubens Prize Collection in the Museum of Contemporary Art, Siegen, Germany.

Three paintings tracing Le Corbusier’s career from the 1920s to the 1940s, and four works on paper from the Heidi Weber Museum collection, are highlights.

Kees van Dongen - Les deux Anges (1907-09) at Christie’s in London on February 28 (€450,000 to €650,000). © Christie’s Images Limited 2017.

American artistic talent will take centre stage during a series of sales dubbed 20th Century at Christie’s from February 28 to March 10. 

The post war and contemporary evening auction at Christie’s on March 7 will feature Mark Rothko’s groundbreaking No. 1, 1949 and Robert Rauschenberg’s Transom (1963) which comes to auction alongside a major retrospective of his work at Tate Modern.

The contemporary art evening auction at Sotheby’s features Gerhard Richter’s luminous 1982 landscape Eisberg (Iceberg) and L’Homme au Papillon by Jean Dubuffet.

These events will be followed avidly by international buyers who flock to London for the spring art sales and by bidders and viewers from around the globe, on the internet.

An embarrassment of riches at Gallery

Des O’Sullivan looks forward to Caravaggio and Vermeer exhibitions.

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) ‘Boy Bitten by a Lizard’, 1594-5 The National Gallery, London. Picture: Copyright The National Gallery, London 2017

The first of two of this year’s highly anticipated exhibitions at the National Gallery of Ireland - which amounts to an embarrassment of riches by Caravaggio and Vermeer— opens today in Dublin.

‘Beyond Caravaggio’ brings together over 40 works including four works new to Ireland by the artist, as well as significant works by those artists he influenced. 

It runs from today until May 14.

Francesco Buoneri (or Boneri) called Cecco del Caravaggio (c1589 after 1620) ‘A Musician’, c1615 The Wellington Collection, Apsley House. Picture: Apsley House, London © Historic England.

It will be followed in June by a show which will bring together 60 paintings from around the world, including no less than 10 by Vermeer. 

This represents almost a third of his surviving oeuvre. ‘Vermeer and the Masters of Genre Painting: Inspiration and Rivalry’ will include work by Gabriel Metsu, Jan Steen, Gerard ter Borch, Pieter de Hooch and Frans van Mieris. 

Organised by the National Gallery with the Louvre and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, it will run from June 17 to September 17.



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