Suzie McAdam is constantly inspired and influenced. Whenever she travel abroad, she will always study every detail of her surroundings and the design and materials chosen.

Suzie McAdam Occupation: Interior Designer

What’s your background?

I have always been creative. From my earliest days as a child, all I wanted to do was colour and make things. Art was a haven whilst in secondary school and it was here that I became initially fascinated in art history and architecture. 

Whenever I travelled abroad, even from an early age, I would study every detail of my surroundings and how the design and materials of the buildings gave it architectural vernacular.

Architecture ended up as my first choice and I received a place at DIT. Similar to maybe a lot of students, I knew quite quickly that it wasn’t a perfect match. 

I had always been drawn to texture, shape, and colour and felt my interest and passion was drawn more towards the interior and furniture of a space.

Of course, they are both intrinsically linked, but I made the hard decision to change course after a couple of years. 

So I was in a new environment and a new challenge, but suddenly everything clicked for me. I felt I had found my calling and loved every detail of the design phase within the Interior Design course.

A snapshot from a recent project on Merrion Square called The Wilde, which is part of a new building by Iconic Offices.
A snapshot from a recent project on Merrion Square called The Wilde, which is part of a new building by Iconic Offices.

What’s a typical work day like for you?

My average work day is extremely varied. I wake up every morning excited about what the day will bring, and what new projects are around the corner. 

Of course it is extremely hard work and I face many challenges and stressful times, but with every challenge, I grow more confident and knowledgeable as a designer. 

In the morning, I would generally have a site meeting going through details with contractors, then some client meetings where I update them on the design. Sourcing — which can be in Ireland and abroad — and plenty of coffee in between.

Tell us about a recent project/ favourite project you worked on?

I have just completed a Merrion Square design, which has been one of my favourite projects. They are such magnificent buildings with incredible Georgian architecture — the scale creates the perfect backdrop for striking lighting and furniture.

What’s your design style?

My design philosophy is to create unique and stylish interior spaces, incorporating functionality, light, and the all-important wow factor. My own style and aesthetic is eclectic and always evolving.

Saarinen marble table with three copper Plumen bulbs, a copper Arne Jacobsen kitchen tap and two small copper Tom Dixon pendants, form this kitchen brief.
Saarinen marble table with three copper Plumen bulbs, a copper Arne Jacobsen kitchen tap and two small copper Tom Dixon pendants, form this kitchen brief.

What/Who inspires your work?

I am constantly inspired and influenced by every detail of my surroundings and the design and materials chosen. I love watching old movies, mainly for the film sets. 

I also attend all of the international design shows, which I think is hugely important to see and touch all of the products, I find it’s very influential.

What’s your favourite trend at the moment (if you have any)?

Maximalism: In all areas of design pattern, colour, and materials. Bold, rich, and deep paint colours such as deep teals and navies will make a big impact this year. Rich materials such as walnut floors and striking marble are making waves, as well as bold geometric patterns.

What’s your most treasured possession?

My home, as I’ve recently moved house from a super contemporary new build to a Victorian house and I’m still in awe of all of the architectural details. I adore the sitting room which is on the first floor. 

It has two large sash windows, high ceilings with beautiful coving details and a large fireplace with original green tiles and copper surround. I could sit there endlessly and admire it.

Design/life interview: Suzie McAdam, Interior Designer

Who would be your favourite designer, or style inspiration?

Kelly Wearstler, the LA-based interior designer is an endless inspiration. Her fearless creations are trend-setting. The Italian firm, Dimore Studio, have an incredible aesthetic and I was lucky enough to visit their studio in Milan for Design Week.

What would be a dream project for you to work on?

I have just started one of my dream projects which is an hotel. Alas I cannot reveal the details until it is complete, but if you follow my blog you may get some behind-the- scenes shots.

Have you any design tips for us?

A good lighting scheme is one of the few ways you can control and vary the mood through the day. I layer lighting with down lights and pendants and then a number of lamps and/or wall lights. White light works really well.

You can see more of Suzie Mc Adam’s work via her website: www.suziemcadam.com, or her social media sites: Instagram @suziemcadam; Pinterest @suziemcadam; Snapchat @suziemcadam; Facebook: www.facebook.com/suziemcadamdesign

Contact interiors@examiner.ie 

for profile information if you are an interior architect, interior designer, a designer, craftsperson or architect.


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