This is a wonderful time of year to visit an art gallery at your leisure, writes Des O’Sullivan. 

There are art galleries scattered throughout Ireland and this is a wonderful time of year to visit one at leisure. 

In Cork there is still time to catch ‘Conflicting Visions in a Turbulent Age (1900-1916)’ at the Crawford Gallery until August 20.

It focuses on social and political themes, including the First World War, the Cork International Exhibition of 1902-03, the consecration of the Honan Chapel in 1915 and the rise of the Irish agricultural co-operative movement. 

There are paintings, posters, film footage, photographs and ephemera from public and private lenders.

Robert Ballagh - Birth of the Irish Republic from the show at the Hunt Museum.
Robert Ballagh - Birth of the Irish Republic from the show at the Hunt Museum.

‘A Terrible Beauty’ at the Hunt Museum in Limerick is a centennial reflection by artist Robert Ballagh. He has long been inspired by 1916 and the Rebellion and its leaders have been a recurring theme. It runs until August 28.

‘Roger Casement, Voice of the Voiceless’ has just opened at the National Musuem of Ireland on Kildare St in Dublin.

It explores his humanitarian work investigating atrocities in the rubber trade in Africa and South America.

Casement’s reports caused a public and political outcry that led to the reform of some of the worst practices in the rubber trade.

An interior by Geraldine O’Riordan from the summer exhibition at the Lavit Gallery in Cork.
An interior by Geraldine O’Riordan from the summer exhibition at the Lavit Gallery in Cork.

‘Mirrored River’ at Visual in Carlow, runs until October 16 with an exhibition of Enda Bowe’s photographic work.

The Irish-born, London-based artist is concerned with story telling and the search for light and beauty in the ordinary.

Opening next Saturday at the National Gallery in Dublin is an exhibition of prints and drawings acquired over the last five years.

A generous donation of over 160 prints received from Brian Lalor in 2014 underlines how the national collection continues to benefit from the generosity of private donors. It charts the development of print making through the centuries.

Alexander Calder’s Le Serpent Rouge (The Red Snake) from Leslie Waddington’s Collection.
Alexander Calder’s Le Serpent Rouge (The Red Snake) from Leslie Waddington’s Collection.

The second part of the display includes some of the most beautiful and unusual watercolours, drawings and prints acquired by purchase or gift since 2011. 

This part of the exhibition features drawings by Fernand Lèger, Walter Osborne and Kyffin Williams, as well as prints by Berthe Morisot, Frank Brangwyn and Micheal Farrell.

Meantime the summer exhibition at Cork Arts Society until August 25 displays a selection of Irish art, paintings, sculpture and print from a variety of Irish artists.

It is just one of a number of shows now on in public and private galleries.


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