Eye exams can reveal a lot about your health

THEY may be the windows to the soul, but eyes can also give a clear view of what’s occurring in less ethereal parts of the body. In fact, an eye test could reveal a life or death situation.

“Getting an eye examination is a bit like getting a whole physical examination,” says ophthalmic surgeon Dr Steve Schallhorn. “There are a variety of eye and general health conditions that can be picked up in an eye examination that are essentially silent.”

Here’s how a simple eye test could help save your life.

Diabetes: Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can creep up very slowly and are often dismissed as normal tiredness, or just part of growing old, but Dr Schallhorn points out that he’s diagnosed cases from eye tests.

High blood-sugar related to diabetes can cause problems in the small blood vessels resulting in diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to blindness. An optometrist will be able to spot early characteristic changes, such as tiny leaks from damaged blood vessels.

“You don’t need to go blind with diabetes; it’s treatable and the key is to pick it up early,” says Dr Schallhorn. Not only that, but the sooner diabetes is detected, the sooner it can be treated or managed, meaning other potential complications — including ulcers, kidney and heart damage — can be prevented too.

High blood pressure: Effects of high blood pressure — linked with stroke, heart disease and vascular dementia — can sometimes be seen inside the eye. This is because the force of blood passing through blood vessels in the retina can cause hypertensive retinopathy.

Blood vessel walls may thicken, narrowing the vessels and restricting blood from reaching the retina. In some cases, it becomes swollen and its function is limited, and there may be bleeding behind the eye.

High cholesterol and cardiovascular problems: Because of the high blood flow at the back of the eye, excessive cholesterol — which is linked to cardiovascular problems — may also be spotted there, looking like deposits in the blood vessels. Changes in the patterns of ocular veins and arteries can also be linked to cardiovascular disease and stroke. “You can see strokes in the eye, and other cardiovascular problems,” says Dr Schallhorn. “The back of the eye is part of the brain, so anything that can affect the brain can affect the eye — and often they affect the eye first.”

Arthritis: Although arthritis is characterised by joint inflammation, autoimmune forms of the disease (like rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) can affect other parts of the body including the eyes, and the inflammation it causes can be spotted in eye tests.

Dr Schallhorn explains that this inflammation (uveitis) is the same kind that can attack joints. “It can slowly destroy the eye too,” he says. “Arthritis is another one of the diseases where eye examinations are important, as the ocular manifestations can have grave consequences if left untreated.”

Tumours: The eye has a large blood supply relative to its size, says Dr Schallhorn, and for this reason, certain types of tumours can spread to the eye, as well as primary tumours developing there — although this is rare. Brain tumours can also be spotted in an eye test, sometimes through swelling of the optic nerve linked to pressure from the tumour.


Lifestyle

Food news with Joe McNamee.The Menu: All the food news of the week

Though the Killarney tourism sector has been at it for the bones of 150 years or more, operating with an innate skill and efficiency that is compelling to observe, its food offering has tended to play it safe in the teeth of a largely conservative visiting clientele, top-heavy with ageing Americans.Restaurant Review: Mallarkey, Killarney

We know porridge is one of the best ways to start the day but being virtuous day in, day out can be boring.The Shape I'm In: Food blogger Indy Power

Timmy Creed is an actor and writer from Bishopstown in Cork.A Question of Taste: Timmy Creed

More From The Irish Examiner