Best treatments for Restless Legs Syndrome

* I suffer from restless legs syndrome. Do you know of anything natural that I can take to stop this. It is particularly intense at night time.

>> Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) often causes more trouble for sufferers at night, since it is triggered by periods of inactivity, such as when you are lying down before going to sleep. Taking long trips — especially on aeroplanes — is another common trigger situation.

RLS is actually a neurological disorder, which causes an overwhelming desire to move the legs so that the deep ache, tingling, or burning sensation commonly felt can be relieved.

More common in women than men, this condition has an underlying folate deficiency in a significant number of cases. You could supplement with folic acid, or increase folate-rich foods in your diet — asparagus, spinach, and kale. Another nutrient worth supplementing is magnesium (around 300-400mg daily).

The magnesium/calcium ratio is very important for a number of bodily functions, and excess calcium in the diet can throw this ratio off balance, often resulting in muscle cramping. If you are taking a calcium supplement, it is worth discussing with your health practitioner the benefits of reducing the dosage.

Stretching and massage are fantastic hands-on treatments. You can make any massage even more effective by using a heat balm or oil, such as a cayenne heat rub.

Improve your circulation internally by making a hot drink using a cup of boiling water, a slice or two of fresh ginger root, a heaped tablespoon of raw honey, and a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar. To supercharge your brew, add a decent pinch of cayenne to the mix.

* I read that boswellia capsules can be used instead of Ibuprofen. Can you please advise as to the dosage and how best to use these capsules?

I would also like to know if I can use these preventatively, or just when I am experiencing pain and inflammation.

>> Boswellia, also known as Indian frankincense, is the resin of the Boswellia serrata tree. It is important that you don’t confuse Boswellia serrata with Boswellia carteri (traditional frankincense resin also used in incense and essential oils), as the two have very different actions in the body.

This supplement can indeed be used in place of ibuprofen, since the active ingredient — boswellic acid — supports the vascular system and helps to relieve inflammation and help reduce vessel constriction. Boswellia is used to treat headaches, sports injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, arthritic conditions, and even menstrual cramps.

I recently discovered just how effective the anti-inflammatory properties of boswellia are with my dog. She is coming up for 13 and has the very beginnings of arthritis. The vet tried a number of approaches to no avail but after just two days of boswellia she was bouncing around like a puppy.!

The usual adult dosage recommendation is 450mg of boswellia daily, as three doses of 150mg each to relieve pain. When the pain is particularly intense or acute, you can increase this dosage to 300mg (maximum). It is best to take boswellia at the onset of pain for it to work most effectively.

You can indeed take boswellia as a preventative supplement if you have a long-term inflammatory joint or muscular condition. In this case you will need to take 250-300mg daily. It is important to note that boswellia is effective in relieving symptoms, but it will not address the root cause.


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